diak, v.s.is/are not; does not exist; non-existent.
diak a bechachau; diak a kall, diak a udoud, diak a chad er a blai.
diadiakv.s.redup.
dikeang
/di kea
/di keang
/dikea
v.s.inch.no longer; no more; not... after all.
di keang a mla er ngii e mla mo diak, udoud a di keang.
dimlakv.s.pastwere not; did not exist; was/were non-existent.
dimlak a di mla diak, dimlak le medung er a cheldecheduch, dimlak rengesii, dimlak lemei.
ng diakmod.no.
ngdiakcont.ng diak
diak a rengulexpr.inconsiderate; impolite.
mo diakexpr.run out; stop; disappear; become non-existent.
Examples:
> I am going to read you a list of statements and you tell if you agree, disagree, neutral or don't know.
> Droteo can neither eat nor sleep well any more.
> I'm not changing my mind./I'm sticking to my decision.
> I don't have time to go to the party.
> His family and the villagers were quite surprised at the boy's sudden good health and quick recovery.
Proverbs:
> It's like the food of Beachedarsai: though small in quantity it never runs out
i.e., something beneficial (food, money, etc.) keeps coming in steady supply (from an unknown source).
> Like Beachedarsai's food, only a little but it does not disappear.8
Beachedarsai and a friend, one day, went to heaven. On arrival they were very hungry, so they visited one of the gods who provided food for them. The "food" was one tiny piece of taro and a bit of fish. Beachedarsai thought to himself that this would hardly suffice, but he picked up the taro and ate it. As he did so another piece appeared on the plate. He ate the piece of fish and another piece of fish appeared. His friend also ate and on his plate as well a new piece of taro or fish appeared as each was consumed. When they were satisfied, there remained on their plates a piece of taro and fish. The idiom is applied to any small blessing, such as a small but steady income, or Western meals that, in contrast with the Palauan tray full of food, are served in small portions, and so on.
> The nose is right there, but it can't be licked
The nose is very close to the mouth, but, no matter how reassuringly available, it cannot be licked by the tongue. The idiom cautions those who are careless with their possessions to be less assured about wealth.
> If it is my lunch it can be divided, if it is yours then it cannot
Two men habitually trapped fish in the same region of the lagoon. One would occasionally ask the other to join him at lunch, the other would always refuse. One day the man who refused arrived with no lunch. When the usual invitation was extended the man refused, saying that, anyway, he had no lunch. The invitation was insistently pressed until the reluctant one gave in. As they split the taro between them the one who shared made the above statement. The idiom is a mild rebuke of a retentive person
> Our nose is close (to the mouth), but cannot be licked.
i.e. we shouldn't be too sure of, or overconfident in, ourselves.
More Examples:
> What is in your hand? It is a cigarette, not gun.
> No, I don't need help.
> Go check the rambutan in the rain forest. If there are ripe ones, bring them home but make sure to hide them so people don't bum them off you.
> Shall we go pick some clams?
>

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