Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bletech, v.r.s.having gotten thrown at; pounded; cracked.
bletech a uletech; mla obetech, mouetech, metechii a blai, metech, betechel a blai.
See also:
chelsureor, v.r.s.cooked with coconut syrup.
chelsureor a mla mechesureor; chosureor a miich er a ilaot, mengesureor.
See also:
cheltiruir, v.r.s.made dizzy (by betel nut).
See also:
delibek, v.r.s.kicked (away); swept away; fended off.
delibek a mla medibek; melibek a bduu, dibekii, duibek a bduu el olab a uach, dbekel.
See also:
klekool, v.r.s.played.
See also:
selechosech, v.r.s.(solid food) bitten into; (head) to closely shorn.
selechosech a kliok; mla mesechosech; kukau a selechosech; suchesechii; klard, sechesechel a kukau.
See also:
uldidm, v.r.s.spied on; watched for carefully.
uldidm a mla mudidm; mla moues; rrechorech el udoud a uldidm; mdedmii; mdidm; udedmel.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bengkengkall, v.a.s.is to be laid on ground.
bengkengkall a kirel el obengkangk; mengkengkii a bambuu, mengkangk a kerrekar, mo blengkangk, bengkengkel.
See also:
chedool, v.a.s.is to be roofed.
chedool a lechengaol a chado er ngii; locha chado er a blai, chodeuii, chemado, mengado er ngii, chedouel.
See also:
delemekill, v.a.s.(post, stick, etc.) is to be driven into ground.
delemekill a kirel el medelemakl; kirel mukedechor; dolemeklii er a chutem; dolemakl a smengtel a chutem, mellemakl, delemeklel.
See also:
kldall, v.a.s.is to be pinched (with fingernails).
See also:
koesengall, v.a.s.(plants) are to be fertilized.
koesengall a kirel el mekoeas; locha ramek; koesengii, mengoeas er ngii.
See also:
serechall, v.a.s.is to be cleansed/bathed in hot water.
serechall a serochel; kirel el mesarech, smarech a cheluib el mo toluk, serechel a cheluib.
See also:
smechekill, v.a.s.is to be put in order, corrected or improved.
smechekill a kirel mesmechokl; sumecheklii a rengul, sumechokl a chebirukel el mo melemalt; smecheklel.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
kimtype of large clam; female genitals.bekekimsmell of clams (after cleaning or cooking clams).
bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).
rasechblood.rasechbloody.
rechorechstealing; theft; robbery; selfishness.delibuksurechorech(knot) tied securely so as not be loosened.
silssun; day.bekesils(boys) smell sweaty or gamey (after perspiring in sun).
bausmell; odor; scent.bekebau(cooked meat or fish, cooking pot, etc.) foul-smelling.
besbastrash; rubbish; litter; debris.besbesiileasily litter.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
melemlim a rengulCurious, prying, snoopy, inquisitive, nosy.
mengas er a rengulastonished; surprised.
kersos a rengulyearning; anxious (to see).
medengelii a rengulregain consciousness (after a faint or stroke); (person) self-confident or self-assured; (person) knowing his abilities or capacities.
olseked er a rengulstick to something (without giving up); be firm.
rrou a rengulsuddenly confused or perplexed.
blekebek a rengulpleasant/nice (in personality); congenial.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.162.181.75','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')