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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

cheloes, v.r.s.(rope, etc.) frayed.
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delangch, v.r.s.set aside; recognized; mounded.
delangch mla medangch er a chutem; beluut er a chutem; rullii el mo mengerengird, dongchii a tuu; dmangch, dengchel.
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ilengel, v.r.s.halted or stopped from the side; headed off.
ilengel a ollumel el delasech el kerrekar, ilengel a mui er a ralm, klalo er a irechar.
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klboub, v.r.s.(house) walled.
klboub a klbokb; mla mekboub; ngar er ngii a kboub, kibekbii, kiboub, kbekbel.
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teleu, v.r.s.widened; opened wide; (legs) spread; unfinished.
teleu a blok; teleu a chesimer; tmengii a ngerel, diak el blutek; tengel.
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uloch, v.r.s.stepped on and crushed; crouched down.
uloch a berrotel; mechengii er a delul a chudel; uloch e omdidm er a merechorech.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bechoel, v.a.s.is to be connected.
bechoel a kirel el obech el mo ta medal, omech er a taem, mechir a omerael diak el dob, mech a eru el baeb el mo tang; bechil a baeb.
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brecherechall, v.a.s.is to be brought to boil.
brecherechall a kirel el obrechorech mrecherechii a klengoes, brecherechel.
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debedebokel, v.a.s.is to be thought about or remembered.
debedebokel a kirel el mudasu, kirel el medebedebek a meldung el tekoi; dobedebekii, dobedebek a urreor el kirel a klengeasek.
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didimall, v.a.s.is to be sprayed or splashed all over.
didimall a kirel el medidiim; mesubs; dellomel a didimall, duiim er a ralm, melidiim er a ralm; didimel.
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dkoel, v.a.s.is to be supported or propped up.
dkoel a kirel el medik; dikir, kmedii, klok a dkoel er a tebel.
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ongemekall, v.a.s.is to be pushed out with effort.
ongemekall a kirel mongemek, ongemek er a dechil; ngemekel a cheroll; ongemekii.
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techelekill, v.a.s.is to be moved or pushed up and away; is to be cleared.
techelekill a kirel el metechelokl; kirel el metemotem a oreomel; melechelokl er a kedidai; rullii el mo moded; tucheleklii a chutem; techeleklel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
kelebusjail, prison.kelebusjailed; in jail; (child, etc.) undergoing punishment.
chedechuulknack/magical power for doing things; blueprint; plan (for house, bai, etc).chedechuulingenious; clever; inventive.
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechascoconut at later stage (between medecheduch and metau) when shell blackens and husk turns yellowish brown.
rekungland crab.bekerekungsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs, etc.).
cheolubarnacles.cheolubarnacles.
chelechedsmall sea crab.chelechedhusked.
daktfear; awe.bedektallfearful; shy.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
kie a rengul calm down; stop worrying.
nguibes a renguldesirous of; lusting after.
rengul a ngaisyolk of egg.
mengurt a rengulhurt (feelings); make (someone) despair.
mesisiich a rengulstrong-willed; motivated; determined; hard-working.
tngeklel a rengulpeace offering for someone.
klou er a renguldetermined.

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