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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

ilengel, v.r.s.halted or stopped from the side; headed off.
ilengel a ollumel el delasech el kerrekar, ilengel a mui er a ralm, klalo er a irechar.
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kluld, v.r.s.pinched (with fingernails).
kluld a mla mekuld er a kuk; kmuld; ulsiu a kekul er a bedengel a chad.
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nglader, v.r.s.sent or seen off; returned; sent back; (bride) brought to prospective husband family.
nglader a mla mengader; mla ngoderii; ngelekel a nglader; ngederel
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ulekedurs, v.r.s.laid, put or knocked down; put to bed.
ulekedurs a mla mokedurs; mla mo mechiuaiu; rengalek a ulekedurs er a blai.
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ulsechomel, v.r.s.hiding in fear; cowering in fear; (bird with) folded wings (due to fear).
More Examples:
> That bird is cowering with folded wings.
> The boy is hiding in his house because the police are looking for him.
ulterebek, v.r.s.raped.
ulterebek a mla moterebek; mla oterebekii, oterbekel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bechekill, v.a.s.is to be made to float/let to drift.
bechekill a kirel el obechakl, ngera a kired el omechakl? becheklel.
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bedesall, v.a.s.(fish) is to be boiled in water; (tongue) is to be cut.
bedesall a mereched el mo marek, modes a ngikel, bedakl el diokang.
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ngimersall, v.a.s.is to be extracted; is to be picked or pulled out.
ngimersall a kirel el mengmors; melmors a ochur; ngimersii a kot, ngimors, ngimersel.
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orsersall, v.a.s.is to be drowned or made to sink.
orsersall a kirel el morsors, locha er a bertakl; orsersii a mechut el diall, orechorech, orsersel.
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sbadel, v.a.s.is to be told or informed.
sbadel a kirel el mesubed; beluu a sbadel er a urreor; subedii a beluu, sbedel a urreor.
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selokel, v.a.s.is to be washed.
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tematel, v.a.s.is to be straightened up.
tematel a smechekill; kirel el metamet; tometii a rengul; tuamet a chebirukel; temetel a cheldecheduch.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
tutkwart on sole of foot; disease of kebui leaves.tutkwart on sole of foot; disease of kebui leaves.
chullrain; rainy season.chullrain; rainy season.
cheluchcoconut oil; fuel (e.g. gasoline, kerosene, diesel oil, etc.); grease (from meat being cooked).bekecheluchsmell of coconut oil.
martilionghammer.martilionghammer.
chemanglarge sea or mangrove crab; Samoan crab.bekechemangsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs).
cherouwhite mushroom; white scar.cherouwhite mushroom; white scar.
choalechsea urchin.choalechsea urchin.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
orrechorech a rengulextremely angry; wild with anger.
diak lodengelii a rengul(person) unaware of his limitations or overestimates his abilities or overextends himself with committments.
dechal a rengul perseverance; ambition; strong will.
mengurt a rengulhurt (feelings); make (someone) despair.
smiich a rengulfeel proud about (someone).
mekngit er a rengulnot good for; not all right with.
beltik a rengulbetik a rengul

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