Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

delidiich, v.r.s.shined upon; lighted up.
delidiich a mla medidiich; mocholt a kotel me a chelebulel; delidiich er a meteet, melidiich er ngii; didichel.
See also:
deluingel, v.r.s.(teeth) blackened.
See also:
ildesall, v.r.s.(fruit) pared or shredded.
See also:
telooch, v.r.s.(baby, animal) fed with pre-chewed food.
telooch a rringet el kall; ngalek a menga telooch; tmochii, tmooch; tochel a ngalek.
See also:
ulekesebech, v.r.s.controlled; (price) lowered.
ulekesebech a telkib el mo er a bab me a lechub eou; mla mokesebech; mekesebechii a iklel; mekesebech a oruikl e osiik a soal.
See also:
ulengelt, v.r.s.sunk (into soft ground).
ulengelt a mla mongelt; ngar er a chelsel a chutem; mechas a ulengelt er a mesei, ongeltii, olengelt, ongeltel.
See also:
uleong, v.r.s.jumped or vaulted over.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

dechall, v.a.s.is to be increased or raised in amount.
See also:
diberdall, v.a.s.is to be laid crosswise.
diberdall kirel el medbard; diak le llemolem; mo delbard, diberdii a bambuu er a rael el melenget.
See also:
kudall, v.a.s.is to be dammed or delayed.
kudall a kirel el mekaud; melecha kaud, koudii a ralm, kmaud a bong, kudel.
See also:
ngisall, v.a.s.(ongraol) is to be cooked or boiled in water; (tapioca) just ripe for boiling.
ngisall a kirel el mengiokl; ngisall a ongraol er a kebesengei el diokang.
See also:
orretall, v.a.s.is to be made to run.
orretall a kirel el morurt; skuul er a kldachelbai a orretall, orretii el mo ungil, orurt a osisechakl er a usaso, orretel.
See also:
otebedall, v.a.s.is to be taken out.
otebedall a kirel el motobed el mo er a kirel, otebedii er a delengchokl, otobed, otebedel.
See also:
sbedall, v.a.s.(coconut tree) is to have cut re-opened to re-initiate sap flow.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
mengchongchthick betel nut fiber used for wrapping food, making rain hat, etc.chellibelmengchongchwhite; (woman) beautiful/white-skinned.
bangikoibutterfly; moth.bangikoiprone to moving from one girlfriend/boyfriend to another.
chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).chermallPalauan money in form of green or blue glass beads.
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechasget blackened with soot or ink; (pot) get burned or discolored.
dechudechdirt; mud; patching material; filling (for cavity).dechudech dirty; muddy.
ngulasthma.ngulasthmatic; suffering from a bout of asthma.
kobesossea horse.kobesossea horse.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
belengel a rengulastonishment/amazement.
ultebechel a rengulhonest; mature and responsible.
luut er a rengulanything causing one to lose one's resolve.
mekikngit a rengulfeel rather sad or sorry about; rather mean or inconsiderate.
melatk a rengulconsider someone's feelings.
orreked er a rengulrestrain or control (oneself) (esp., from showing anger).
chelimimii a rengulsullen; obstinate; uncooperative.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','107.23.176.162','CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')