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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blouch, v.r.s.split; cracked.
blouch a diak le cherrungel, mla obouch; bleuechel, omouch, blouch a bambuu, buchel.
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chelat, v.r.s.smoked (fish).
chelat a ulekmarek el ngikel er a chat; cheltuul; mla mechat, chotur, chemat a ngikel, chetul.
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cheluiu, v.r.s.read; looked at closely.
cheluiu a ules; mla mechuiu; menguiu, chuieuii a babier, chemuiu a mederir, chieuel.
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telitai, v.r.s.rolled.
telitai a mla metitai; titiur a lius, toitai a bduu; melitai er a bdungel; titiul.
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telngot, v.r.s.(food) obtained, sought or foraged on.
telngot a seliik; mla metngot; melngot a odoim; tngetngel.
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ulekellakl, v.r.s.held on slant or at angle.
ulekellak a dkois; turekorek, tingoi a ochil a ulekellak a omerolel; olekang a ulekellak.
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urriik, v.r.s.chased out; expelled; gotten rid of.
urriik a mla moriik; modik; orikii a bilis, oriik a katuu, orikel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

kitall, v.a.s.is to be pressed with fingers and massaged; is to be pressed against surface with fingers; is to be softened.
kitall a kirel mekit; mengit er ngii; omet el mesisiich.
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ochebngall, v.a.s.is to be brought to surface of water.
ochebngall a kirel el mochob; mei er a bab; olechob er a mlai, ochebngii a ert el mei er a bebul a daob; ochebngel.
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orecherechall, v.a.s.is to be sunk.
orecherechall a kirel el morechorech; locha er a chelsel a daob; orechorech a mechut el diall; orecherechel.
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sbungel, v.a.s.is to be snapped/pecked at; is to be harvested.
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tekiungel, v.a.s.needs to be talked to; (person) is being talked about (because of bad behavior, etc.).
tekiungel a kirel el mo er ngii a tekoi; soadel er a beluu, tekiungel er a beluu er a omengubs.el sers.
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tengdall, v.a.s.is to be pricked (from tungd).
tengdall a kirel el metungd; tungdii a medudes er a buld; tmungd a bduu; tengdel.
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tirterall, v.a.s.is to be hunted or investigated.
tirterall a siokel; kirel el meteriter; tirterii a klemerang; tiriter a ungil, merriter a tekoi; tirterel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
kurstwitching (nervous disorder) .kurstwitching (nervous disorder) .
cheludechwooden float for fish net; light weight wood used to make corks.cheludechwooden float for fish net; light weight wood used to make corks.
bengtpurple colored sweet potato.bengtpurple.
cheballwhite-leafed taro (yautia); gray/white hair.cheballgray-haired; white-haired.
rubakelder; old man; chief; foreign man; boyfriend; husband.rubakhaving the qualities of an old man.
chudelgrass.chudelmarijuana.
otordblunt-headed parrot fish.otordblunt-headed parrot fish.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
omak er a rengul(person) takes the edge off (his/her) hunger.
tngeklel a rengulpeace offering for someone.
cheldeng a rengulconfused; surprised; stubborn; dull-witted; slow (in understanding).
kedeb a rengulshort tempered; impatient.
ngelekel a rengulfavorite child.
mengedidai er a rengul act stubbornly, scornfully or condescendingly.
chidirengulchaidirengul

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