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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelterochel, v.r.s.neglected; abused.
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cherremetai, v.r.s.messed up; disarranged; confused.
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rrodech, v.r.s.tried or aimed at blindly; tricked into giving information.
rrodech a mla merodech; rodechii mla medangch.
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telotech, v.r.s.seized; grabbed.
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ulekdirt, v.r.s.dried out.
ulekdirt a ungil el medirt; mla mukdirt; diak el dekimes; ukdertel
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ulengelt, v.r.s.sunk (into soft ground).
ulengelt a mla mongelt; ngar er a chelsel a chutem; mechas a ulengelt er a mesei, ongeltii, olengelt, ongeltel.
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ultamet, v.r.s.pulled at; drawn tight or taut.
ultamet a mla motamet; klurs; ert a ultamet el mong; mla otemetii, otamet a kerrekar, otemetel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

belochel, v.a.s.is to be shot with a slingshot.
belochel a kirel el obalech; belechall, melechii, omalech, malech, belechel.
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chetekill, v.a.s.is to be held or led by the hand; is to be carried, towed or persuaded; easily persuaded; (woman) easily seduced.
chetekill a beot el mechetakl; di ngera e ng mechetakl; diak a uldesuel; di remurt a ngor; choteklii, cheteklel.
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dechall, v.a.s.(trap) is to be set.
dechall a kirel el medachel; melachel er a bub, dochelii a bedikl, dmachel, dechelel.
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sbedall, v.a.s.(coconut tree) is to have cut re-opened to re-initiate sap flow.
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sengeakl, v.a.s.(odoim or rice) is to be cooked or boiled in water.
sengeakl a kirel el mesengoes; odoim a sengeakl; smongosii, songoes, melengoes, sengosel.
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terudall, v.a.s.is to be broken, torn or smashed down; is to be taken apart.
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udechemall, v.a.s.is to be caught or captured.
udechemall a kirel el mudechem; kirel el motoir el moreked; mdechemii a malk; mdechem a babii, udechemel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
lottapeworm.lot having a tapeworm.
tangtikebikelsee-saw; teeter-totter.tangtikebikelsee-saw; teeter-totter.
idokeldirtiness; filthiness.idokel dirty; filthy.
bausmell; odor; scent.bekebau(cooked meat or fish, cooking pot, etc.) foul-smelling.
sengerengerhunger; starvation.bekesengerengerget hungry easily; always getting hungry.
kudlouse.kdaolinfested with lice.
otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.oteklikllying down with feet in air.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
mechitechut a rengulweak willed; unmotivated; easily discouraged.
klsbengel a rengulanger.
tuobed a rengulone's real feelings come out.
mesisiich a rengulstrong-willed; motivated; determined; hard-working.
rengul a cheluch dregs of coconut oil.
llemesel a rengulhis/her/its intelligence.
mesbesubed er a rengulprepare someone (psychologically) for something; pave the way for more serious discussion with someone; inform gradually or indirectly.

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