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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blutek, v.r.s.shut; closed.
blutek a mla obutek; ulsiu, mutek, mtekii, blutek a medal, btekel.
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chelsechosm, v.r.s.dented all over (from tapping).
chelsechosm a ulduum e betok a blet er ngii; terretirem; ulduum, chelsechosm el olekang.
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cheltikaik, v.r.s.tempted; led astray.
cheltikaik a cheltakl; cheltekill, cheltimaim er a rengelekel.
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telirem, v.r.s.hit against; (pot, dish etc.) chipped.
telirem a telkib el telemall; telkib el mekngit; tiremii a medal; teremel a reng.
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ulak, v.r.s.anchored.
ulak a urrebet a okul; diak lorael; bilas a ulak me ng diak lobechakl; llechotel; okul.
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uldedelid, v.r.s.(message, etc.) passed from one person to another and distorted.
uldedelid a uldelid; mla merael a betok el chim; mesei a uldedelid e merael a klaiueribech er ngii.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bkiikl, v.a.s.is to be opened; is to be lifted open/up.
bkiikl a obibkais, mkisii, mkais, bkiikl el kiuar, bkisel.
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kesiil, v.a.s.(coconut or taro) is to be grated or scraped.
kesiil a kirel el mekes; menges a lius, kesiil a kles er a klechedaol, kosir, kmes a kles, kesil.
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ochisall, v.a.s.(new) is to be announced or told.
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okikall, v.a.s.is to be transported or brought.
okikall a kirel el mokiik; olekik; okiik a kall er a ocheraol.
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okingall, v.a.s.is to be seated or appointed.
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sekesekoall, v.a.s.is to be crawled or crept over.
sekesekoall a kirel el mesekesako; melekesako er ngii; kongesachel el rael a sekesekoall.
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tekuall, v.a.s.is to be carried in cupped hands.
tekuall a kirel el metaku; tekiul; melaku, tmaku a uasech; tokuar a sub, tekuel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).chermallcheromel
temamuuimaginary ghost with ugly face.temamuuimaginary ghost with ugly face.
ureorwork; job; task.bekureorwork a lot; hard-working; diligent.
diulareng(someone's) happiness/joy.dmeuhappy; glad; joyful; appreciative.
uloechspear(?).uloech(person) in a hurry to go somewhere.
klukuktomorrow; the next or following day.klukuktomorrow; the next or following day.
katuucat.bekekatuusmell of a cat.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

diak a rengulinconsiderate; impolite.
dmeu a rengulhappy; glad; joyful; appreciative.
mechedeng a rengulget surprised, puzzled or perplexed (by someone's behavior, etc.).
medecherecher a rengul stubborn; adamant; not easily swayed.
cheberdil a rengulobject of one's feelings/affections.
klurt a rengul(feelings) hurt.
betachel a rengulis to be pleased/satisfied/appeased; content.

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