Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelamech, v.r.s.(betel nut) chewed; (tobacco) smoked.
chelamech a mla mechamech; chomechii, chuamech a buuch, chemelel a chelamech meng dikeang.
See also:
tellechekl, v.r.s.put aside; cringing; inconspicuous.
tellechekl a chebecheb el chelellakl; tellechekl el meluluuch.
See also:
ulsengerenger, v.r.s.allowed to go hungry.
ulsengerenger a blechoel el songerenger, smecher er sengerenger; ulsengerenger a sebechel el mad er a sbekekl.
See also:
ultab, v.r.s.placed on raised surface; hindered or delayed temporarily; seated (in doorway) with legs dangling outside; sitting down for a short time.
ultab a mla motab; diak el lerrekui; otebengii; dirkak lebo el merek; otab, otebengel a cheldecheduch; ultab a diak le meketeket el dengchokl; ak di ultab er a tuangel; otebengii e olengull, otab a klebngel; otebengel.
See also:
urrekerek, v.r.s.(juice, gravy) reboiled and thickened.
urrekerek a mla morekerek; mla mo medirt; urrekerek el uasech, merkerekii a miich, orekerekel.
See also:
urriik, v.r.s.chased out; expelled; gotten rid of.
urriik a mla moriik; modik; orikii a bilis, oriik a katuu, orikel.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chedechall, v.a.s.is to have glow cast upon it.
chedechall a kirel el obtanget el mo mengeldoech; toluk a chedechall, cheldoech, cheldechel.
See also:
esemall, v.a.s.is to be tried out/challenged.
esemall a kirel el measem; meues el mo ungil, kirel mo er a omelasem er a uchei er a bo ltobed; esemii, esemel a ngloik.
See also:
kersall, v.a.s.is to be pulled, towed or dragged.
kersall a krukl; kirel el mekurs; kursii a mlai, otemetii, kmurs a kerrekar.
See also:
odermeremall, v.a.s.is to be pushed or forced (under water, into ground, etc.).
See also:
ongtiall, v.a.s.is to be begged or asked for.
ongtiall a kirel el mongit; ongtil a udoud, ongtiall a udoud el ngeso er a reberriid er a eolt.
See also:
tekiungel, v.a.s.needs to be talked to; (person) is being talked about (because of bad behavior, etc.).
tekiungel a kirel el mo er ngii a tekoi; soadel er a beluu, tekiungel er a beluu er a omengubs.el sers.
See also:
ukeruul, v.a.s.is to be given medicine; (fish) is to be salted.
ukeruul a kirel el mukar; omkar; osbitar a blil a ukeruul el omkar a secher; toktang a omkar a secher.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
riklbold/violent behavior.meriklbold; violent; restless.
rekungland crab.bekerekungsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs, etc.).
chelsebengoshandsomeness.chesbengoshandsome; beautiful.
mechiechab hole.mechiechab hole.
klukuktomorrow; the next or following day.klukuktomorrow; the next or following day.
kemangetlength (of string, etc.) which exceeds what is needed or expected.kemangetlength (of string, etc.) which exceeds what is needed or expected.
sengerengerhunger; starvation.bekesengerengerget hungry easily; always getting hungry.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
ultebechel a rengulhonest; mature and responsible.
derengulalso, used a as friendly expression of envy.
omult er a rengulconvince; persuade.
merechorech a rengulselfish; greedy; stingy.
mengerar er a rengul criticise; insult; put down; make someone feel ashamed; hurt someone's feelings.
bebeot a rengulrather undecided about something; not taking something too seriously.
dmolech a rengulwise; prudent; careful in planning ahead.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.166.130.157','CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')