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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bldaoch, v.r.s.(sea) beaten with pole; (fruit) knocked down with pole.
bldaoch a mla obedaoch; nglai, medaoch, medochii, a iedel a bldaoch; bedochel.
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blkais, v.r.s.opened; lifted open/up.
blkais a mla obkais; blok, blkais a chesimer, mkisii, mkais, bkisel.
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selmesumech, v.r.s.bidden farewell; given divorce payment; refused gracefully.
selmesumech a mla mesmesumech; buch a diak el selmesumech; diak a olmesmechel; mla merael.
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seluub, v.r.s.studied; learned; imitated.
seluub a mla mesuub; suub a chelitakl; suebii a ngloik; suebel
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ulechoid, v.r.s.messed up.
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urreked, v.r.s.held onto; grasped.
urreked a urrekodel; mla orkedii a chutem; urreked a mesei e mekreos; orekedel a klalo.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chemuul, v.a.s.about to be broken in two.
chemuul a kirel el mecham; kerrekar a chemuul; chomur, chuam a sengsongd, chemul.
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kedelsall, v.a.s.is to be made thicker.
kedelsall a kirel el mo kedols; kilungii, mengedols er ngii; mo klou, kodelsii, kedelsel.
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kekeringall, v.a.s.is to be made smaller or reduced in size.
kekeringall a kirel el mo kekerei; mengkekerei; kokeringii a blengur, kmekerei a mo delikik el kall, diak le klou, diak luleiis; kekeringil.
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kingall, v.a.s.is to be sat upon.
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oibekall, v.a.s.is to be broken or smashed through.
oibekall a kirel el moiubek; tmoech er a bitang; kboub a oibekall, oibekii, oiubek, oibekel.
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ongchengchall, v.a.s.is to be dropped down from tree; (restriction) is to be removed.
ongchengchall a kirel el mongchongch; ongchengchii a bul er a uel; mo diak a bul el telkib, ongchengchel.
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ukrengall, v.a.s.is to be guided, advised or led.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.
rirfallen leaves of kebui.merirthe color yellow.
tebekbukrayfish.tebekbuk(skin of shin) rough.
chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).chermall having vagina which lubricates quickly.
bsibsdrill; termite.teribisibsfull of holes.
kelmolmaction of tickling (lightly).mekelmolmticklish; tingling; sensitive.
iudoraiburent-a-car; U-drive car.iudoraiburent-a-car; U-drive car.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

omech er a rengultake the edge of one's hunger.
derengulalso, used a as friendly expression of envy.
olsarech er a rengulhold in or control emotions, anger etc.
meses a rengulindustrious; diligent.
oba a rengulindependent; self-willed.
kersos a rengulyearning; anxious (to see).
betik a rengulhaving a deep feeling or affection for; love.

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