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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blidokl, v.r.s.cast or tossed (e.g. fishnet); thrown underhand (as in softball); thrown out(side); located far from others (as if tossed away).
blidokl a mla obidokl; blides, mideklii, midokl, bideklel.
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chelaus, v.r.s.sprinkled with lime; woven.
chelaus a mla mechaus; chemelel a chelaus, mengaus, chusel a chemachel; chousii a oruikl, chemaus a tet, chusel.
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cheltiruir, v.r.s.made dizzy (by betel nut).
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klbadel, v.r.s.told; informed.
klbadel a mla subedii; selubed, mla dmung me ng kirel el medengei
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telechui, v.r.s.(anus) wiped.
telechui a seluld; mla metechui a btil a ngalek, tuchui, melechui, techiul.
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uldedelid, v.r.s.(message, etc.) passed from one person to another and distorted.
uldedelid a uldelid; mla merael a betok el chim; mesei a uldedelid e merael a klaiueribech er ngii.
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ulechar, v.r.s.filled with liquid.
ulechar a mla mochar; ulekeek; ollumel a ulechar er a ralm; mecherur a butiliang.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bechetall, v.a.s.is to be extracted or extirpated.
bechetall a kirel el obechit, kirel el motobed, mechetir, medal ngikel a bechetall.
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cholodall, v.a.s.is to be comforted or consoled.
cholodall a kirel el mechelaod, mengelaod.
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debedeball, v.a.s.is to be weighed.
debedeball a debedabel
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ochelall, v.a.s.(fish) is to be scaled.
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osebekall, v.a.s.is to be made to fly.
osebekall a kirel el mosebek, osebekii, osebek a skoki, osebekel.
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otutuul, v.a.s.is to be suckled, nursed, given milk.
otutuul a kirel el motut; msa tul; tolechoi a otutuul, otutur, otutul.
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serechall, v.a.s.is to be cleansed/bathed in hot water.
serechall a serochel; kirel el mesarech, smarech a cheluib el mo toluk, serechel a cheluib.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
ngulasthma.ngulasthmatic; suffering from a bout of asthma.
mekealdhot water; hot drink (esp., coffee).mekealdhot water; hot drink (esp., coffee).
meduumale genitals (large).meduu(testicles) swollen; (pig) having testicles/uncastrated.
riamelfootball fruit (Pangi; Payan).bekeriamelsmell like football fruit; sweaty; have a strong body odor (especially, as result of diet or poor hygiene).
burekswelling.oburekget dyed or stained with color.
chelechedsmall sea crab.chelechedarea of shallow water (usually exposed at low tide and good for fishing).
chadliver.chedengaolsick with jaundice.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
milkolk a rengul(person is) stupid.
kngtil a rengul(someone's) being mean or feeling sad or frustrated.
ukab er a rengul(something sentimental) arouses one's emotions (touch someone's figurative heart).
omak er a rengul(person) takes the edge off (his/her) hunger.
melekoi a renguldetermined; well-motivated; make rasping or humming sound in the lungs; make humming moise while sleeping; (cat) purr.
mekeald a rengulfeel hot inside.
bedis a rengulinconsiderate.

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