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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

delaes, v.r.s.criticized.
delaes a mla medaes; te mla melaes er ngii, dmesii er a blulekngel, deleklel.
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delengesakl, v.r.s.(person or thing) under a spell.
delengesakl a mla medengesakl; chad a mla melengesakl er ngii; olengit a mekngit el kirel; dongeseklii er a chelid.
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nglader, v.r.s.sent or seen off; returned; sent back; (bride) brought to prospective husband family.
nglader a mla mengader; mla ngoderii; ngelekel a nglader; ngederel
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ulengoid, v.r.s.(food) given or exchanged ceremonially; messed up; put in wrong place.
ulengoid a mla merael a betok el chim; mla mongoid a chutem; ulengoid el cheleuid a rolel; ulechoid; cheliseksikd kung; ongidii a chutem, ongoid a udoud, ongidel.
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uloch, v.r.s.stepped on and crushed; crouched down.
uloch a berrotel; mechengii er a delul a chudel; uloch e omdidm er a merechorech.
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ulskosk, v.r.s.pushed vigorously.
ulskosk a mla moskosk; mla modubech; uldubech el mong; oskeskii, olskosk er ngii, oskeskel.
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ultuub, v.r.s.degraded; insulted; slandered.
ultuub a mla motuub; oba el melekoi a terechedel me a klebelngul; ultuub er a rsechelil; otubel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bengall, v.a.s.is to be interrupted.
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chideball, v.a.s.is to be hung onto with hands.
chideball a kirel el mechidobel, chimal a chedam a chideball er a rengelekel, choidebelii er a demal, mengidobel, chidebelel.
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chilotel, v.a.s.is to be oiled, greased or anointed.
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debekill, v.a.s.is to be cursed.
debekill a kirel el medebeakl; melebeakl er ngii; kmal mekull el diak el debekill a chad, rechad.
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edongel, v.a.s.is to be coaxed into doing something; is to be flattered/whetted/sharpened; easily flattered.
edongel a chad el di beot el mo oumera a diak le mera el chetengakl; edengii, edengel.
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ulochall, v.a.s.is to be prophesied about.
ulochall a kirel el mulaoch; omlaoch er ngii; mlochii a meringel el kodall; mlaoch a klebelung; ulochel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
kltombluntness; dullness.ketom(knife, etc) blunt or dull.
ngulasthma.ngulasthmatic; suffering from a bout of asthma.
tedobech(one) half.tedobech(one) half.
telengtungdwild tamarind; lead tree.telengtungdwoven with small weave.
kerisgoiter.keris (neck) swollen with goiter.
lusechluck.melusechalways lucky.
brakgiant yellow swamp taro.brakhaving a vagina which stays dry during sexual intercourse.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
mekikngit a rengulfeel rather sad or sorry about; rather mean or inconsiderate.
melemedem er a rengulcool down one's anger.
klsbengel a rengulanger.
omech er a rengultake the edge of one's hunger.
derengulalso, used a as friendly expression of envy.
kie a rengul calm down; stop worrying.
Rengulbaititle of chiefs in Imeliik.

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