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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bloch, v.r.s.stepped on and crushed.
bloch a mla oboch, mla merot, uloch; mechengii a delul el meduu, moch a chudel, bechengel.
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chellobel, v.r.s.protected; sheltered.
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chelsureor, v.r.s.cooked with coconut syrup.
chelsureor a mla mechesureor; chosureor a miich er a ilaot, mengesureor.
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delibuk, v.r.s.tied into knot.
delibuk a mla medibuk; omech a eru el klalo; melibuk a odak a erung e doibuk el mo tang el blech, delibkolel.
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ulekedelad, v.r.s.carried or transmitted with care; (person or animal) spoiled.
ulekedelad a ungil el kldmokl; diak el terrekakl; ngalek a ungil el ulekedelad a okerulel; mla mukedelad.
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urrebet, v.r.s.dropped.
urrebet a mla morebet; mla me er a eou; orrebet a mengur; orebetii, orebetel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

iuochel, v.a.s.is to be opened or cut open.
iuochel a kirel el meiuch; meliuch a mengur, imuich a mekebud.
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oimimall, v.a.s.is to be lowered; (boat) is to be moved out to deep water; (food) is to be brought to meteet.
oimimall a kirel el moimoim; oimimii a bilas el mo er a dmolech; oimoim, olimoim, oimimel; mo er a eou. oimimel; oimimel a oimoim er ngii; olimoim.
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oitall, v.a.s.(liquid) is to be poured (into container).
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rekiaol, v.a.s.is to be finished (completely).
rekiaol a kirel el merekui; urreor a di rekiaol kung; mochu merek.
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tebteball, v.a.s.is to be broken up in small pieces.
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tngekill, v.a.s.is to be appeased or consoled
tngekill a kirel el metngakl; kirel el mengunguuch; tingeklii a rengul a meltord; locha tngakireng; tngeklel.
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udall, v.a.s.(fishnet) is to be pulled in.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chemarsleak (in something like a boat or a bucket).chemarsleak (in something like a boat or a bucket).
lottapeworm.lot having a tapeworm.
butgenitals; anus; vagina; bottom (surface).bekebut(woman) having large buttocks or vagina; (man) having large buttocks.
berechsmell of raw fish.bekeberechsmell of the sea or raw fish.
berdlip.berdaol (fish, people) thick-lipped.
hambunghalf.hambunghalf-witted; simple-minded.
burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.burachedhaving skin covered with white spots.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
omech er a rengultake the edge of one's hunger.
mengesib er a rengul get someone angry.
teloadel a rengulindecisive.
chetellaok a rengulchetellaok
melekoi a renguldetermined; well-motivated; make rasping or humming sound in the lungs; make humming moise while sleeping; (cat) purr.
mesubed a rengulaccept; be resigned to; learn a lesson; learn from experience.
selorech a rengulcondescending.

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