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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blerek, v.r.s.spread; stretched out; propagated.
blerek a mla oberek; berrokel, omerek a babier, merekii, merek a chais, berekel.
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chelaet, v.r.s.(rope; wire; fishing line; etc.) wound; (baby) cuddled.
chelaet a mla mechaet; iluodel iliud, chemetii, chemaet a ekil.
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delik, v.r.s.supported; propped up; placed in a particular location.
delik a mla medik; loia chiull e a smecher a ultuil er ngii, dikir, dmik, smecher a delik er a dik, dkel; delik a kldoel, kled, kall a delik er a tebel, dikir a tet er a ulaol, melik er a til er a ulaol.
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rredekekl, v.r.s.(distance) jumped.
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telebakel, v.r.s.patched; (fine) paid.
telebakel a telabek.
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ultechelbakl, v.r.s.pushed into water.
ultechelbakl a mla mutechelbakl; ngar a chelsel a daob; sidosia a urresors; otechelbeklii, otechelbeklel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chemechemuul, v.a.s.is to be broken into pieces.
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chesill, v.a.s.is to be get blackened with soot or ink.
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chesuall, v.a.s.(food) is to be stirred so as not to stick to pan.
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lkiil, v.a.s.(bottom of pot; basket) is to be lined with leaves; etc.
lkiil a kirel el melik; loia lkil; likir a chelais er a ngimes, lmik, lkil.
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oimimall, v.a.s.is to be lowered; (boat) is to be moved out to deep water; (food) is to be brought to meteet.
oimimall a kirel el moimoim; oimimii a bilas el mo er a dmolech; oimoim, olimoim, oimimel; mo er a eou. oimimel; oimimel a oimoim er ngii; olimoim.
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ongtiall, v.a.s.is to be begged or asked for.
ongtiall a kirel el mongit; ongtil a udoud, ongtiall a udoud el ngeso er a reberriid er a eolt.
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sudall, v.a.s.is to be erased; is to be dried or wiped off.
sudall a mesesusuud; ulechel a kim a sudall; suedii, smuud.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
kobesossea horse.kobesos (head) long, narrow or pointed.
chetbaelelephantiasis.chetbael swollen from elephantiasis.
bodechcurved configuration/shape of boat.bodechesausstanding erect/in ramrod fashion; standing with expanded chest.
uidfruit that has fallen off the tree on its own.udallis to be glued or pasted.
kemangetlength (of string, etc.) which exceeds what is needed or expected.kemangetlength (of string, etc.) which exceeds what is needed or expected.
chetaubrief rain squall.chetaubrief rain squall.
diablongdevil.diablongterrible; awful; (person) evil.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
raud a rengulvariable; indecisive.
sesuul a rengul(person) undecided.
mereng er a rengulplease; go along with (so as not to hurt feelings).
beralm a rengullazy; unmotivated; unconcerned; uncaring.
merirem er a rengulhurt someone's feelings.
klikiid a renguluninvolved.
mesubed a rengulaccept; be resigned to; learn a lesson; learn from experience.

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