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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

deles, v.r.s.cut; sliced; slit (open).
deles a mla medes; mekekerei el delobech, dosengii, dmes a ngikel, s. meles, desengel.
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ulchelucheb, v.r.s.(cooking food) covered with leaf, bag, etc.
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uldasu, v.r.s.thought about; taken into consideration.
uldasu a omdasu, omelebedebek; urrereel a rael a ngar a uldasu; udesuel a beches el skuul.
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ulekeroul, v.r.s.raised; cultivated.
ulekeroul a mla mukeroul; ungil a ulekerulel; ungil el ulekeroul a omekdubech er a ungil buai.
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uleld, v.r.s.(coconut candy) made.
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ulitech, v.r.s.made to lean to side; capsized; lying on one's side.
ulitech a mla muitech; omitech; dengchokl el dkois; ulitech e le ng meringel a sengchel; utechel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bechedall, v.a.s.is to be broken off/broken into pieces.
bechedall a kirel el obached, omached er ngii; kukau a bechidel, mechedii, bechedel.
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chetechetioll, v.a.s.is to be wounded.
chetechetioll a kirel el mechetechat; mengetechat er ngii, mekull, diak chetechetioll a chad me a charem.
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kikidall, v.a.s.is to be absolved, purified or emptied.
kikidall a kirel el mekikiid; mo klikiid, mo beches, kikidii a beluu, kmikiid a blai, kikidel.
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oietall, v.a.s.is to be deflected or turned away.
oietall a kirel moiit; oleiit, oietii, oiit a telechull; nguu el mei er a eou; meluchel a oietall, oietel.
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orekerekall, v.a.s.is to be pushed sideways.
orekerekall a kirel el morekorek; orekorek a chutem; odubech el mong; orekerekel el mei.
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uduudel, v.a.s.is to be given money or paid.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
olechutellarge bamboo raftolechutellarge bamboo raft
chedeadjellyfish; nettle.chedead not knowing where to go.
burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.burachedhaving skin covered with white spots.
chetbaelelephantiasis.chetbaelelephantiasis.
karmasuuscowfish.karmasuuscowfish.
ngulasthma.ngulasthmatic; suffering from a bout of asthma.
bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).bobaidull; slow-witted.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
omatek er a rengul restrain ones desire to do something; keep ones desire(s) to oneself.
kngtil a rengul(someone's) being mean or feeling sad or frustrated.
moalech a renguldisappointed; dismayed.
olseked er a rengulstick to something (without giving up); be firm.
dmeu a rengulhappy; glad; joyful; appreciative.
meched a rengulthirsty; impatient; prone to overreact; (deprived and) having strong desire for.
mereng er a rengulplease; go along with (so as not to hurt feelings).

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