Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

berrokel, v.r.s.spread; stretched out; propagated.
berrokel a mla oberk; mla mesumech; berrokel a ungil el chisel, merekii, merek, berekel.
See also:
delebongel, v.r.s.interrupted; killed.
delebongel a diak el llemolem; mla medeb; dobengii a cheliuaiu; delebongel a klengar er ngii a mlokoad, debengel a medal.
See also:
iluchet, v.r.s.unhooked.
iluchet a mla meiuchet, nglai er a techerakl, meluchet er ngii.
See also:
iluil, v.r.s.rolled up.
iluil a mla meiuil; diak le blerk, ilii a bar; imuil a chedecholl, ilel a chedecholl.
See also:
rrebek, v.r.s.groped at.
rrebek a mla merebek; mla robekii a ochab el oba biskang.
See also:
telab, v.r.s.(ear, nose) pierced for ring etc.
See also:
telamk, v.r.s.(beard; bristles; etc.) shaved; (broom) made out of stripped coconut ribs.
telamk a mla metamk; telemikel; tuamk a chesemel; tomkii a bdelul; temkel.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bekesengchall, v.a.s.is to be forced open/pulled apart by force.
bekesengchall a kirel el obekesangch, obok, mekesengchii a chesimer, mekengii, bekesengchel.
See also:
lechengaol, v.a.s.is to be put/taken.
lechengaol a kirel el modars; kles a lechengaol er a bai; loiang, lochang.
See also:
orsersall, v.a.s.is to be drowned or made to sink.
orsersall a kirel el morsors, locha er a bertakl; orsersii a mechut el diall, orechorech, orsersel.
See also:
osengerengerall, v.a.s.is to be allowed to go hungry.
osengerengerall a kirel el mosengerenger; uasech a osengerengerall el mo urrekerek; osengerengerel.
See also:
otutekiil, v.a.s.is to be told on or accused.
See also:
tebetball, v.a.s.(long object) is to be divided or split into small pieces, strips, etc.
See also:
tekiungel, v.a.s.needs to be talked to; (person) is being talked about (because of bad behavior, etc.).
tekiungel a kirel el mo er ngii a tekoi; soadel er a beluu, tekiungel er a beluu er a omengubs.el sers.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
mbesaoldrool; spittle.mbesaoldrool; spittle.
rasechblood.rasechblood.
uloechspear(?).uloech(person) in a hurry to go somewhere.
chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.
kemangetlength (of string, etc.) which exceeds what is needed or expected.kemangettall; long (in time or dimension).
brakgiant yellow swamp taro.brakhaving a vagina which stays dry during sexual intercourse.
secheleifriend; companion; boyfriend; girlfriend; lover; term of address from a woman to a group of people.bekesecheleifriendly; having many friends.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
mechas a rengulbe surprised at.
merat a renguldeeply disappointed or hurt.
moalech a renguldisappointed; dismayed.
bebeot a rengulrather undecided about something; not taking something too seriously.
nguibes a renguldesirous of; lusting after.
melai er a rengulpersuade.
chelimimuul a rengulchelimimii a rengul

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.81.131.189','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')