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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

berrius, v.r.s.carried along by (current, flood).
berrius a mla oberius; obechakl, merusii, mlai a berrius er a berius, berusel.
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kledaes, v.r.s.(matter) explained.
kledaes a deledaes; mla mededaes; diak le cheliseksikd; kledesel
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klsai, v.r.s.decreased; reduced.
klsai a kesai; ngelsonges; klsai er a rechad er a Belau.
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kltukl, v.r.s.obvious, apparent, clear.
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uldor, v.r.s.shaded; sheltered.
uldor a mla mudor; ngar er ngii a blil; telenget er a chull me a sils; mderengii, uderengel.
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ulsaker, v.r.s.girded with loincloth; tied around.
ulsaker a mla musaker; ngar ngii a usekerel; ousaker, ulsekoll, rubak a ulsaker, msekerii, msaker, usekerel.
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ulsengerenger, v.r.s.allowed to go hungry.
ulsengerenger a blechoel el songerenger, smecher er sengerenger; ulsengerenger a sebechel el mad er a sbekekl.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bidekill, v.a.s.is to be cast/thrown.
bidekill a kirel el obidokl; midokl, mideklii, bduu a bidekill, bideklel.
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diberdall, v.a.s.is to be laid crosswise.
diberdall kirel el medbard; diak le llemolem; mo delbard, diberdii a bambuu er a rael el melenget.
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okidall, v.a.s.is to be consumed; is to be used or eaten up.
okidall a kirel el mokiid; okiid; mo diak; okidel.
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okingall, v.a.s.is to be seated or appointed.
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otutuul, v.a.s.is to be suckled, nursed, given milk.
otutuul a kirel el motut; msa tul; tolechoi a otutuul, otutur, otutul.
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udidall, v.a.s.is to be bridged.
udidall a kirel el mudid; loia did er ngii; omdid er a toachelmid; mdidar, omoachel a udidal a delebechel er a didall.
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ukadel, v.a.s.(fish) is to be caught by casting net.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
dechudechdirt; mud; patching material; filling (for cavity).dechudech dirty; muddy.
kobengodelvery strong current.kobengodelvery strong current.
bodechcurved configuration/shape of boat.obodechcurved; (person) having back curved towards rear.
chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).chermallcheromel
kemangetlength (of string, etc.) which exceeds what is needed or expected.kemangetlength (of string, etc.) which exceeds what is needed or expected.
kerasuschigger.kerasusbitten by chiggers.
choalechsea urchin.choalech(head) having bristly hair.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
meleolt a rengul(person) carefree or nonchalant; (person) not easily disturbed or content to let things happen as they may.
derengulalso, used a as friendly expression of envy.
telematel a rengulpleased; happy.
mengerar er a rengul criticise; insult; put down; make someone feel ashamed; hurt someone's feelings.
mekngit a rengulfeel sorry/sad about; mean; inconsiderate.
olturk a rengulsatiate; make someone give up (from fatigue); get one's fill of; insult continuously or mercilessly; let someone really have it.
Dirrengulbaititle of feminine counterpart or assistant to chief in Imeliik.

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