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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bliochel, v.r.s.sifted; filtered; pure; unadulterated; one of specific kind.
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chelmekl, v.r.s.(person) stubborn, persistent, determined, etc.
chelmekl a mla mechemekl a rengul; mengemekl, chomeklii, mesisiich el oltaut a loumerang.
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kled, v.r.s.put or placed down.
kled a kldoel; menged, babier kled er a bebul a tebel.
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klemuu, v.r.s.(person) having shaven head or closely-cropped hair.
klemuu a mla mekemuu; komungii a bdelul, mengemuu; telamk a chiul.
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telecheb, v.r.s.removed; scraped up; cut out; uprooted.
telecheb a nglai el cheroid; mla metecheb a belsiich; tuecheb a chetermall; tochebii a debsel a lius.
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teltekakl, v.r.s.plucked or torn off; pulled at.
teltekakl a nglai er a ulach; mla metetekakl a dui; totekakl a llel a tuu; teteklel.
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uluit, v.r.s.boiled several times.
uluit a mla obuit; brak el meketeket el ngar a ngeliokl a uluit; omuit a brak.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

oidall, v.a.s.is to be copied, translated or transferred.
oidall a kirel el moiuid; mutechei; chutem a oidall, oidii, oiuid a ngakl, oidel.
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orretall, v.a.s.is to be made to run.
orretall a kirel el morurt; skuul er a kldachelbai a orretall, orretii el mo ungil, orurt a osisechakl er a usaso, orretel.
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selokel, v.a.s.is to be washed.
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udiuul, v.a.s.is to be pulled in.
udiuul a kirel el mudai; mengurs er ngii el oba udai; omdai er ngii; telemall el ert a udiuul.
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ukbechesall, v.a.s.is to be renovated or repaired.
ukbechesall a ukbechesuul; kirel mukbeches; mekbechesur a mechut el skuul; mekbeches a llach, ukbechesul.
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ukdengchekill, v.a.s.is to be seated.
ukdengchekill a kirel el mukedengchokl; mo dengchokl; mekedengcheklii, omekedengchokl er ngii.
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ukdengesall, v.a.s.is to be made full or satisfied.
ukdengesall a kirel el mukdinges; mekelii el mo medinges; mo diak el sengerenger; mekdengesii, omekdinges er ngii; ulekdengesel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chelechelouldandruff.chelecheloulhaving dandruff.
rekungland crab.bekerekungsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs, etc.).
siktcluster/bunch of fruit.mesiktbe in a cluster (used only in mesikt el btuch).
mongkcomplaint; criticism.bekemongkalways complaining.
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechasget blackened with soot or ink; (pot) get burned or discolored.
otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.
chellingsclearness; transparency; purity; pristine condition.mechellings(liquid, glass, etc.) clear or transparent.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
merat a renguldeeply disappointed or hurt.
mechese a rengulbecoming surprised.
songerenger a rengulhave a strong desire for; lust after.
smiich a rengulfeel proud about (someone).
llemesel a rengulhis/her/its intelligence.
tmuu er a rengul(something) occurs to (person)/enters (person's) mind.
Rengulbaititle of chiefs in Imeliik.

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