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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

kltukl, v.r.s.obvious, apparent, clear.
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uldum, v.r.s.made to appear.
uldum a mla modum; ulecholt, ngalek a uldum a bdelul er a daob; mla tmoech; odmii, odum, sils a uldum; odmil.
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ulekdubech, v.r.s.(plant) cultivated; (business, etc.) established or started.
ulekdubech a ngar ngii; di mla mukdubech; Belau a ulekdubech a skuul er ngii; klaingeseu er a ocheraol el blai a ulekdubech er a rechuodel el mei.
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ulengoid, v.r.s.(food) given or exchanged ceremonially; messed up; put in wrong place.
ulengoid a mla merael a betok el chim; mla mongoid a chutem; ulengoid el cheleuid a rolel; ulechoid; cheliseksikd kung; ongidii a chutem, ongoid a udoud, ongidel.
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uliisech, v.r.s.shown; instructed.
uliisech a mla moisech; ulecholt a ildisel; oliisech er a blai; urrereel a rael a uliisech.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bechoel, v.a.s.is to be connected.
bechoel a kirel el obech el mo ta medal, omech er a taem, mechir a omerael diak el dob, mech a eru el baeb el mo tang; bechil a baeb.
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chiudall, v.a.s.is to be twisted or wrung.
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demedemekall, v.a.s.is to be softened, weakened, tenderized or calmed.
demedemakall a ruoll el mo medemedemek; ngeliokl el brak a demedemekall, domedemekii, domedemek, demedemekel.
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kelidel, v.a.s.is to be warmed or heated up.
kelidel a beot el mo mekeald; soal el mekeald; blai el smengt kelidel.
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okelall, v.a.s.is to be fed or made to eat.
okelall a okall.
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okull, v.a.s.is to be anchored.
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rechuul, v.a.s.is to be moved, readied or set in order.
rechuul a kirel el merech; udesuall, siokel a rolel, rochur a blil a melekdik a delengchokl; rechuul a delengcheklel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.chadalive; living.
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.
cherouwhite mushroom; white scar.cherouwhite mushroom; white scar.
tutkwart on sole of foot; disease of kebui leaves.tutkwart on sole of foot; disease of kebui leaves.
bikodelhives or rash from allergies; allergic reaction affecting the skin.bikodelhives or rash from allergies; allergic reaction affecting the skin.
chadliver.chedengaolsick with jaundice.
chaseborash.chasebohaving rash or prickly heat.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
omatek er a rengul restrain ones\ desire\ to\ do\ something\;\ keep\ ones desire(s) to oneself.
mereng er a rengulplease; go along with (so as not to hurt feelings).
ralmetaoch a rengulinsensitive; not easily affected; easygoing; casual; prone to avoiding responsibility.
mimokl a rengulbroad-minded.
orrechorech a rengulextremely angry; wild with anger.
rrou a rengulsuddenly confused or perplexed.
seselkang a rengulbecoming bored or impatient.

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