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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelsechosm, v.r.s.dented all over (from tapping).
chelsechosm a ulduum e betok a blet er ngii; terretirem; ulduum, chelsechosm el olekang.
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chelsuar, v.r.s.(face) slapped; slapped in the face.
chelsuar a chelsbad, chellebed a medal, mla mechesuar.
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chelubel, v.r.s.spilled; poured out; used up; out of stock; (widower and children) left alone (without wife or mother).
chelubel a mla mechubel; uleitel, chubelii, chuubel, chebelel, mengubel, chebelel a uasech.
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klabs, v.r.s.hung with rope; etc.; defeated (in hanahuda = card game).
klabs a mla mekabs; tuu a klebikl, kebsel.
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kldidai, v.r.s.made higher; piled up.
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selenges, v.r.s.(coconut tree) tapped for sap.
selenges a mla mesenges; ilaot a selenges; songesengii; songes, sengesengel.
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telecheb, v.r.s.removed; scraped up; cut out; uprooted.
telecheb a nglai el cheroid; mla metecheb a belsiich; tuecheb a chetermall; tochebii a debsel a lius.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bereberall, v.a.s.is to be snatched, grabbed or seized; (land) is to be captured.
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chechutel, v.a.s.is to be chewed on.
chechutel a deb me a ongchutel; menguchet a deb.
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chetuotel, v.a.s.(headware) to be put on; to be inserted or stuck into or onto; to be impaled or plugged in.
chetuotel a klalo el rruul el mechetiut; klalo, lkou a chetuotel; mengetiut a lochang; otuu; osiseb; chetutel, chetutall.
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debdebsall, v.a.s.is to be objected to.
debdebsall a kirel el medebdobs; meterob, torebengii, dobdebsii a omerael e le ng meringel a daob e meses a eolt; debdebsel.
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kelidel, v.a.s.is to be warmed or heated up.
kelidel a beot el mo mekeald; soal el mekeald; blai el smengt kelidel.
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udedmall, v.a.s.is to be spied on or watched for carefully.
udedmall a kirel el mudidm; berrotel e mes; mdedmii a merechorech, mdidm a omerotel er a klalo, udedmel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
mekealdhot water; hot drink (esp., coffee).mekealdhot water; hot drink (esp., coffee).
rechorechstealing; theft; robbery; selfishness.delibuksurechorech(knot) tied securely so as not be loosened.
chemadechcoconut sap.chemadech (plant) unripe or green; (food) raw or uncooked; be in full standing position when dancing; brand new.
rubakelder; old man; chief; foreign man; boyfriend; husband.rubakhaving the qualities of an old man.
chullrain; rainy season.chullrain; rainy season.
maiscorn.maisblond.
dechuswart; mole.dechuswart; mole.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
ngellitel a rengulchoosy.
tuobed a rengulone's real feelings come out.
medengelii a rengulregain consciousness (after a faint or stroke); (person) self-confident or self-assured; (person) knowing his abilities or capacities.
telecherakl a rengulstubborn; obsessed; determined.
sisiokel a rengulfastidious; particular.
mekngit er a rengulnot good for; not all right with.
moded a rengul(person is) easygoing/even-tempered.

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