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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

cheleld, v.r.s.knocked out of breath.
cheleld a mla mecheld, chad el ruebet el metilech me ng meengel a telil; mo kedeb a telil.
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cherremetai, v.r.s.messed up; disarranged; confused.
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delebekekl, v.r.s.(house) having had roof or overhang lengthened.
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ulekesiu, v.r.s.copied; imitated; made the same.
ulekesiu a meruul el mo ua ngii; mla mokesiu; mekesiur a bilel er a bilek; omekesiu a llecheklel a sensei; okesiul.
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uliub, v.r.s.sneaked away from; hidden from.
uliub a mla moiub; mla mecheuid; oibngii a ngalek; mengeuid er ngii; cheleuid; ngar a "Ngetecheuid".
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ulluut, v.r.s.returned; sent back.
ulluut a mla moluut; mla mengader; udoud a ulluut, olutii, oluut, olutel a udoud.
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ulsirs, v.r.s.(money) pawned or pledged; leaned against.
ulsirs a mla mosirs; mla osisii, osirs a chutem; chetemek a ulsirs er a bank; ulsisel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bengodel, v.a.s.is to be put or held on or against.
bengodel a kired el omenged er ngii; mengedii, omenged, kebui a bengodel er a kerrekar, bengedel.
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cheloall, v.a.s.is to be completed or pursued to end.
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chitemetall, v.a.s.(hand) is to be closed to make fist; is to be crushed into ball.
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kekerongel, v.a.s.is to be watched over or guided.
kekerongel a kirel el mekekar, omes er ngii; me lak le metemall; kokerengii a blil a kelebus, kokar a bangk, mengkar, kekerengel a bang
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okebiil, v.a.s.is to be restrained/held back.
okebiil a kirel el mokebai; meterob; buik a okebiil er a oterul a mekngit el kar; okebir.
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utechedall, v.a.s.(spearhead) is to have barbs made; is to be jerked or pulled.
utechedall a kirel el mutoched; locha techedel; mtoched a biskang, mtechedii a ongerekor; utechedel.
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utiil, v.a.s.is to be put over fire; is to be put or placed; is to be pounded into ground.
utiil a ngklel a irimd. utiil a klalo el kirel el mouat; omat a irimd; melai a mekoll er a budel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

teberoishin; (large, triangle-shaped) coconut candy.teberoishin; (large, triangle-shaped) coconut candy.
bengtpurple colored sweet potato.bengtpurple.
ngelloklnodding; dozing (off).olengelloklslow-moving; sluggish.
mechiechab hole.mechiechab(teeth) full of cavities.
diablongdevil.diablongterrible; awful; (person) evil.
otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

mechitechut a rengulweak willed; unmotivated; easily discouraged.
mengas er a rengulastonished; surprised.
ongemengemek a rengulongemengemek
mengedidai er a rengul act stubbornly, scornfully or condescendingly.
rengulhis/her/its heart; spirit; feeling; soul; seat of emotions.
mekeald a rengulfeel hot inside.
kedeb a rengulshort tempered; impatient.

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