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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

cherroakl, v.r.s.(fish) speared again.
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delekull, v.r.s.buried.
delekull a mla medakl er a chutem, doklii, dmakl, deklel a beldokel.
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nglukl, v.r.s.transported; moved; hit; smashed into or against.
nglukl a mla mengukl; nglai el mo er a kuk ngodech; blai a nglukl el mo er a cheroid; nguklii; ngklel.
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ulcholo, v.r.s.(fish) scaled.
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uldermerem, v.r.s.pushed or forced (under water, into ground, etc.).
ulderemerem a mla moderemerem; ulsarech el ultuu er a daob; ert a ulderemerem er a daob; odermeremel.
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uliubek, v.r.s.broken or smashed through.
uliubek a mla moiubek; lling; ngar ngiia metetoech; chesimer a uliubek; oibekii, oiubek, oibekel.
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urrael, v.r.s.cracked; fractured.
urrael a soal el obeu; obouch; belatong a urrael; sokol el obeu; urrolel a belatong.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bekebekall, v.a.s.is to be gladdened or made happy.
bekebekall a kirel el obekebek, mekebekii a medal, rullii a rengul el mo ungil, mo diak le merur; omekebek er ngii, bekebekel.
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chesbedengall, v.a.s.(face) is to be slapped.
chesbedengall a kirel el mechesbad; mechelebed, chosbedengii, chosbad, diak le chesbedengall a chad.
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cholodall, v.a.s.is to be comforted or consoled.
cholodall a kirel el mechelaod, mengelaod.
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ochisall, v.a.s.(new) is to be announced or told.
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okekiaol, v.a.s.is to be awakened.
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otechekill, v.a.s.is to be deflected or detained.
otechekill a kirel el motechakl; metecheklii e kudmeklii a terruaol, omtechakl er a diak a blil, otecheklel.
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udidall, v.a.s.is to be bridged.
udidall a kirel el mudid; loia did er ngii; omdid er a toachelmid; mdidar, omoachel a udidal a delebechel er a didall.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
silssun; day.bekesils(boys) smell sweaty or gamey (after perspiring in sun).
bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).bobaidull; slow-witted.
chellingsclearness; transparency; purity; pristine condition.mechellings(liquid, glass, etc.) clear or transparent.
uesvision; sight; view.sekoesperceptive; sharp-minded; acute; sensitive; aware of one's responsibilities or surroundings; capable of looking at something thoroughly or seeing all the angles and possibilities.
martilionghammer.martilionghammer.
riklbold/violent behavior.meriklbold; violent; restless.
cheludechwooden float for fish net; light weight wood used to make corks.cheludechwooden float for fish net; light weight wood used to make corks.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
betachel a rengulis to be pleased/satisfied/appeased; content.
mesbesubed er a rengulprepare someone (psychologically) for something; pave the way for more serious discussion with someone; inform gradually or indirectly.
smiich a rengulfeel proud about (someone).
omatek er a rengul restrain ones desire to do something; keep ones desire(s) to oneself.
beltik a rengulbetik a rengul
omerteret a rengulfed up or exasperated with.
sengok a rengulcurious.

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