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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelsuloul, v.r.s.burned thoroughly.
chelsuloul a mla mechas; delul el mo imis; mechesuloul, chosululii, chosuloul a ngikel, chesululel.
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cherrad, v.r.s.crumbled; crushed; messed up; covered with sores; unhealed; rampant.
cherrad a mla mecherad; chordengii chorad a kall; medeel er a rechad; a cherrad el kall.
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ulechar, v.r.s.filled with liquid.
ulechar a mla mochar; ulekeek; ollumel a ulechar er a ralm; mecherur a butiliang.
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ulekang, v.r.s.fed; made to eat.
ulekang a mla mokang; mla omengur; smecher a ulekang; mekelii, omekang er tir; okelel.
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ulsiu, v.r.s.(drawer, suitcase, etc.) closed; (clothes) have seam sewn; (fire) fed; (people) incited to fight.
ulsiu a ulsikm; blutek; mla mosiu; ulsiu a berdel a ngerel.
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ulterebek, v.r.s.raped.
ulterebek a mla moterebek; mla oterebekii, oterbekel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

brechall, v.a.s.is to be speared.
brechall a bruchel; omurech er a temekai, mrechii, murech, brechel.
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ngisall, v.a.s.(ongraol) is to be cooked or boiled in water; (tapioca) just ripe for boiling.
ngisall a kirel el mengiokl; ngisall a ongraol er a kebesengei el diokang.
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ngkedall, v.a.s.(fine) is to be paid.
ngkedall a kirel el nguu a nguked; kirel a odanges; msa ngkedel.
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okekall, v.a.s.is to be filled up.
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okerngall, v.a.s.is to be awakened.
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tengetngall, v.a.s.(food) is to be obtained, sought or foraged for.
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ukrengall, v.a.s.is to be guided, advised or led.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chelechedsmall sea crab.chelechedarea of shallow water (usually exposed at low tide and good for fishing).
secheleifriend; companion; boyfriend; girlfriend; lover; term of address from a woman to a group of people.bekesecheleifriendly; having many friends.
chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).chermall having vagina which lubricates quickly.
ngerachelduty; responsibility.bekengerachelresponsible; always attentive to one's duties or obligations.
martilionghammer.martiliongclumsy; ungraceful; untalented; (person) blunt or hard-hitting (in his words).
teberoishin; (large, triangle-shaped) coconut candy.teberoibow-legged.
chuisworm; maggot.bederechuis(starchy food) spoiled (by water); decomposing or moldy.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
melekoi a renguldetermined; well-motivated; make rasping or humming sound in the lungs; make humming moise while sleeping; (cat) purr.
berngel a rengulanything discouraging to one's spirit.
mederdirk a rengulfeel scorn for.
mengesib er a rengul get someone angry.
mesubed a rengulaccept; be resigned to; learn a lesson; learn from experience.
titmekl a rengultimid; scared.
betachel a rengulis to be pleased/satisfied/appeased; content.

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