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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelluut, v.r.s.slapped; (eyes) smarting (from wind).
chelluut a blar; mla mecheluut; chellebed a medal, cholutii a chetelaol, choluut, uldechelakl.
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klmochel, v.r.s.(blanket, etc.) spread out; (message) sent; (body) massaged, restored.
klmochel a selumech; mla mesumech, sumechii a chedecholl, blerk; suumech a bar, smechel.
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llebal, v.r.s.(hands) washed/dunked in water.
llebal a mla meiebal; telellib a chimal; lobal a chimal, lobelur, meleball.
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ngliik, v.r.s.(excrement) removed.
ngliik a mla mengiik; nglai a dach er ngii, ngikel a dach.
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ultuub, v.r.s.degraded; insulted; slandered.
ultuub a mla motuub; oba el melekoi a terechedel me a klebelngul; ultuub er a rsechelil; otubel.
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uluked, v.r.s.(fish) caught by casting net.
uluked a mla meuked; mekebud a uluked er a chelii.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

cheridall, v.a.s.is to be removed to a distance or moved away.
cheridall a kirel mo cheroid; diak le keed, choridii, choroid; babii a cheridall er a blai; cheridel.
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ngunguchall, v.a.s.is to be prayed to.
ngunguchall a kirel el mengunguuch; ngunguchii me le cheridii er a rrom; ngunguchall el mo soal el mo er a skuul; ngunguchel.
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redekekill, v.a.s.(distance) is to be jumped.
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sedomel, v.a.s.is to be propositioned or proposed.
sedomel a sedemall.
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soadel, v.a.s.is to be separated or explained.
soadel a kirel el mesaod; kirel el obeketakl; soadel a chutem el kmo ng mor; meldung el tekoi a soadel
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suodel, v.a.s.is to be shredded/stripped off.
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terebengall, v.a.s.is to be turned face or top down; is to be stopped.
terebengall a omosech; kirel el meterob; torebengii a omerael; torob a osisebel a mekngit el kar; terebengel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chiechabhole; hollow; cavity (in tooth).mechiechab(teeth) full of cavities.
bisechwild taro (makes mouth itchy).bisechwild taro (makes mouth itchy).
cheolubarnacles.cheolu covered with barnacles.
kekeuathlete's foot; tinea.kekeuathlete's foot; tinea.
rekungland crab.bekerekungsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs, etc.).
semumtrochus.semum having deformed fingers or toes.
bikodelhives or rash from allergies; allergic reaction affecting the skin.bikodelbroken out in hives.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
bltkil a rengulone's affection/concern for.
milkolk a rengul(person is) stupid.
ungil er a rengulfine or all right with.
bekesbesebek a renguleasily worried; worrisome.
ungil a rengulhappy; glad; kind.
ngodech er a rengulfind something strange, different or suspicious.
oubuch a rengultreat person as if he or she were one's spouse.

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