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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bltuut, v.r.s.chiseled.
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chelamech, v.r.s.(betel nut) chewed; (tobacco) smoked.
chelamech a mla mechamech; chomechii, chuamech a buuch, chemelel a chelamech meng dikeang.
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chelubs, v.r.s.ongraol stolen from garden, etc..
chelubs a mla mechubs; chubsii; dellomel el rrechorech er a mesei, chebsel a kukau.
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telau, v.r.s.heated/cooked lightly; heated so as to become bendable; rubbed; massaged.
telau a mla metau; melau a cheled tmau a such; teul er a mekeald.
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uldeu, v.r.s.made happy; pleased.
uldeu a mla mo ungil a rengul; mla modeu a rengul, deulreng.
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ulsarech, v.r.s.pressed down; pinned onto.
ulsarech a ulsongeb er eou; mla mosarech; ngar er a ulsarechg er a oberaod; oserechii, osarech, oserechel.
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urreked, v.r.s.held onto; grasped.
urreked a urrekodel; mla orkedii a chutem; urreked a mesei e mekreos; orekedel a klalo.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

berekedall, v.a.s.is to be pasted or glued onto; is to be leaned against.
berekedall a kirel el obereked. mereked a babier, merekedii, omereked er ngii.
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debedebokel, v.a.s.is to be thought about or remembered.
debedebokel a kirel el mudasu, kirel el medebedebek a meldung el tekoi; dobedebekii, dobedebek a urreor el kirel a klengeasek.
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ochotall, v.a.s.is to be shown or revealed.
ochotall a kirel el mocholt; oterul a mekngit el kar a ochotall er a bulis; ochotii.
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odiaol, v.a.s.is to be shouted or yelled to.
odiaol a kirel el modiu; oldiu, olecholt; ouchais; odiu a belduchel; odiul a udoud.
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otilall, v.a.s.is to be laid down.
otilall a kirel el motuil; otuil a tekoi er a merreder, otilel.
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tengdall, v.a.s.is to be pricked (from tungd).
tengdall a kirel el metungd; tungdii a medudes er a buld; tmungd a bduu; tengdel.
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utechedall, v.a.s.(spearhead) is to have barbs made; is to be jerked or pulled.
utechedall a kirel el mutoched; locha techedel; mtoched a biskang, mtechedii a ongerekor; utechedel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
dechudechdirt; mud; patching material; filling (for cavity).dechudechdirt; mud; patching material; filling (for cavity).
butgenitals; anus; vagina; bottom (surface).bekebut(woman) having large buttocks or vagina; (man) having large buttocks.
tutkwart on sole of foot; disease of kebui leaves.tutkpointer; pole (for picking fruit).
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.
brakgiant yellow swamp taro.brakgiant yellow swamp taro.
chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.chadalive; living.
uesvision; sight; view.sekoesperceptive; sharp-minded; acute; sensitive; aware of one's responsibilities or surroundings; capable of looking at something thoroughly or seeing all the angles and possibilities.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
telirem a rengulfeelings hurt.
merat a renguldeeply disappointed or hurt.
omekerrau er a rengulconfuse; puzzle.
meses a rengulindustrious; diligent.
diak lemesim a rengulstick to one's convictions; not change one's mind.
seitak a rengul(person is) very choosy; picky.
melib er a renguldecide; make up one's mind.

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