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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blkobk, v.r.s.peeled (off).
blkobk a nglai a budel; mla obkobk; mkebkii, mkobk a tuu, bkebkel.
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chelub, v.r.s.(person) given gift or bribed; (thing) given as a gift.
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klsakl, v.r.s.(something) wrong/the matter.
klsakl a ngar er ngii a telemall; mla mekesakl? ke klsakl? tia ng klsakl?
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telamet, v.r.s.straightened out.
telamet a mla metamet; telematel, tometii a rengul; tuamet a chebirukel; temetel a reng.
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ulekeroul, v.r.s.raised; cultivated.
ulekeroul a mla mukeroul; ungil a ulekerulel; ungil el ulekeroul a omekdubech er a ungil buai.
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ultirakl, v.r.s.followed; pursued.
ultirakl a mla motirakl; llach a ultirakl; llach a ulengesenges er a remekedngil a beluu; otireklel a llach.
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urresors, v.r.s.drowned; made to sink.
urresors a mla rusors; mla morsors; ngar er a chelsel a daob, urresors el mlai; orsesii, orsors, orsersel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chedechedechaol, v.a.s.is to be talked about or discussed.
chedechedechaol a kirel el mo rengii a tekoi; kirel el mechedecheduch; chedechedechaol el kirel a betok el ngodech el omerellel.
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debdeball, v.a.s.is to be made into a drink of coconut meat and juice.
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diesall, v.a.s.is to be removed or extracted.
diesall a kirel el meduis; dmuis a delsangel, duiesii, otobed er a chelsel; meluis a semum, diesel a semum.
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kedngiil, v.a.s.is to be tamed.
kedngiil a kirel el mekedmokl el mo kedung; kudngir a ngalek, kudung, rullii el mo kedung.
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otuball, v.a.s.is to be degraded, insulted or slandered.
otuball a kirel a motuub; otubii a sechelil, omerellel a kirel a otuub; oltuub er a cheldecheduch, otubel.
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sebochel, v.a.s.is to be tried on, adjusted or equalized.
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suodel, v.a.s.is to be shredded/stripped off.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

rirfallen leaves of kebui.merir(leaves) yellow.
brotechclapping; wooden paddle used as war weapon; applause; praise.bekebrotechprone to slapping.
chelechelouldandruff.chelecheloulhaving dandruff.
chellingsclearness; transparency; purity; pristine condition.mechellings(liquid, glass, etc.) clear or transparent.
kemimstarfruit.mekemimsour; acidic; spoiled (from having turned sour).
berechsmell of raw fish.bekeberechsmell of the sea or raw fish.
ngulasthma.ngulasthmatic; suffering from a bout of asthma.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

meses a rengulindustrious; diligent.
bekesbesib a rengulprone to sweating; easily angered; touchy.
olsarech er a rengulhold in or control emotions, anger etc.
kedidai a rengulstubborn; scornful; condescending.
omeksebek er a rengulworry (deliberately).
omai er a rengulhesitate; be unsure about.
medengelii a rengulregain consciousness (after a faint or stroke); (person) self-confident or self-assured; (person) knowing his abilities or capacities.

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