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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chellooch, v.r.s.masturbated.
chellooch a mla mechelooch; mengelooch a odoim le ng diak ongraol, chelochel.
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delechudech, v.r.s.soiled (with dirt or mud); patched; tar; pitch; asphalt.
delechudech a mla medechudech; delechudech a chemars er a chado duchedechii, duchudech.
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delidech, v.r.s.blinded or dazzled by a strong light.
delidech a mla medidech; dichel a sils a mo er a medal, delidech a medal er a dichel a sils
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lledes, v.r.s.stretched; placed lengthwise.
lledes a telamet; melemalt, lledokl, mla meledes, llemolem, lodesii; lmedes, lledes a ochil,
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selumk, v.r.s.(hair) pulled out; torn out
selumk a mla mesumk; mla sumkii a sechelil er a klaibedechakl; suumk a chiul.
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uldai, v.r.s.pulled in.
uldai a mla mudai; mla mekurs er a udai, mla motamet; bilas a mla mudai el mei er a cheldukl; udiil.
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urrirech, v.r.s.taken; snatched.
urrirech a mla morirech; mla motitech; mla moribech er a chetemel, orribech a diak el chetemel, orirechel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chemekill, v.a.s.(object which is stuck) is to be freed by inserting lever and prying; (person) is to be tripped or thrown by putting lever (e.g., stick, leg) between his legs.
chemekill a kirel el mechemekl; chomeklii, chomekl a kerrekar.
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cheseangel, v.a.s.is to be assisted by contribution of food or labor.
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redechall, v.a.s.is to be tried or aimed at blindly.
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sebsall, v.a.s.is to be sprinkled, sprayed or watered.
sebsall a sbukl; kirel el mesubs; suubs a dellomel, subsii, melubs er a ralm; sebsel.
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smechekill, v.a.s.is to be put in order, corrected or improved.
smechekill a kirel mesmechokl; sumecheklii a rengul, sumechokl a chebirukel el mo melemalt; smecheklel.
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tetongel, v.a.s.is to be torn or shredded.
tetongel a tetengall.
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utechedall, v.a.s.(spearhead) is to have barbs made; is to be jerked or pulled.
utechedall a kirel el mutoched; locha techedel; mtoched a biskang, mtechedii a ongerekor; utechedel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
uidfruit that has fallen off the tree on its own.udall(fishnet) is to be pulled in.
burekswelling.oburekget dyed or stained with color.
sengerengerhunger; starvation.bekesengerengerget hungry easily; always getting hungry.
telengtungdwild tamarind; lead tree.telengtungdwild tamarind; lead tree.
ureorwork; job; task.bekureorwork a lot; hard-working; diligent.
rirfallen leaves of kebui.merir(leaves) yellow.
secheleifriend; companion; boyfriend; girlfriend; lover; term of address from a woman to a group of people.bekesecheleifriendly; having many friends.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
mesbesubed er a rengulprepare someone (psychologically) for something; pave the way for more serious discussion with someone; inform gradually or indirectly.
mengedecheduch er a rengulthink; say to oneself.
olsiich er a rengultake pleasure in someone else's pain, difficulties, problems, etc.
mimokl a rengulbroad-minded.
cheldeng a rengulconfused; surprised; stubborn; dull-witted; slow (in understanding).
mekikngit a rengulfeel rather sad or sorry about; rather mean or inconsiderate.
melib er a renguldecide; make up one's mind.

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