Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

delkois, v.r.s.placed on slant.
delkois a mla medkois; turekorek, dkois, melkois, torib a delkois a omerolel.
See also:
klemodel, v.r.s.sewn up; (eyes) narrow or slit.
klemodel a klemed; klemodel a medal a mad el chisiabal.
See also:
klsadel, v.r.s.decreased; reduced; depleted.
klsadel a ngesonges er a kirel el ildois; ulengesonges; ngar er ngii a dibus, mengesadel, kosedelii, kosadel.
See also:
rruul, v.r.s.made; done; prepared; (person) born to or made for; (person) trained or conditioned (to do something); (person) born to or made for; (person) trained or conditioned (to do something).
See also:
telbotb, v.r.s.(long object) divided or split into small pieces, strips.
telbotb a mla metbotb; tibetbii a olukl, melbotb a besebes; tibotb, tbetbel.
See also:
ulekord, v.r.s.completed; perfected.
ulekord a blekord; ungil a rrellel; itabori a ulekord.
See also:
ulterau, v.r.s.sold; given away.
ulterau a mla moterau; mla mochar; mla oterau a chutem, oterur a mesei; oterul a klolekled e kid a chelbed.
See also:


Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bedesall, v.a.s.(fish) is to be boiled in water; (tongue) is to be cut.
bedesall a mereched el mo marek, modes a ngikel, bedakl el diokang.
See also:
bkiikl, v.a.s.is to be opened; is to be lifted open/up.
bkiikl a obibkais, mkisii, mkais, bkiikl el kiuar, bkisel.
See also:
cherungall, v.a.s.is to be made whole, completed or perfected.
See also:
cheterechall, v.a.s.is to be neglected or abused.
See also:
keltall, v.a.s.is to be cooled.
See also:
ongeltall, v.a.s.is to be sunk (into soft ground).
ongeltall a olsiseb er a chelsel, kirel el mongelt, dait a ongeltall er a chutem, ongeltii.
See also:
rerongel, v.a.s.(food) is to be heated so as not to spoil; (hands, etc.) are to be warmed over or next to fire.
See also:


State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.
choalechsea urchin.choalechsea urchin.
beraomfish kept until slightly spoiled and then wrapped and barbequed.beraom (fish) slightly spoiled.
chemarsleak (in something like a boat or a bucket).chemars(boat, bucket, etc.) leaky; leaking.
uloechspear(?).uloech(person) in a hurry to go somewhere.
berdlip.berdaol (fish, people) thick-lipped.
chaseborash.chasebohaving rash or prickly heat.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

mellomes a rengulsmart; diligent.
smuuch a rengul(person) calm/placid.
mekikiid a rengulunsympathetic; uncaring; uninvolved; emotionless.
bekokuii a rengulkind; generous.
klsbengel a rengulanger.
omeksebek er a rengulworry (deliberately).
melatk a rengulconsider someone's feelings.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')