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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blodk, v.r.s.cut; slit; operated on.
blodk a mla obodk; medkii, omodk, smecher a blodk a delel, bedkel.
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nglaml, v.r.s.(grass, garden, yard etc.) cut.
nglaml a nglemull; mla mengaml; ngomlii a rael; nguaml, melaml, ngemlel.
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rriik, v.r.s.swept.
rriik a kliut; mla meriik; mekesokes a rriik, riekii, remiik.
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selaod, v.r.s.separated; explained.
selaod a lloched; mla mesaod; diak el uldak; chebechiil a selaod; rengalek me te selaod, smodii, sodel.
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telok, v.r.s.(toe) stubbed; (wood) planed against grain.
telok a ultok; diak el ungil; diak el ngar er a urebetellel a tekoi; telok el cheldecheduch.
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telukouk, v.r.s.(land) cleared.
telukouk a teluchel; mla metukouk a chutem; mengaml e mesib; toukukii a sersel; tukukel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

kimungall, v.a.s.(person) is to have head shaven.
kimungall a kirel el mekemuu; metamk a bdelul, kimungii el mo diak a chiul, klemuu, kimungel.
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kitall, v.a.s.is to be pressed with fingers and massaged; is to be pressed against surface with fingers; is to be softened.
kitall a kirel mekit; mengit er ngii; omet el mesisiich.
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oteruul, v.a.s.is to be sold or given away; for sale.
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ririuul, v.a.s.is to be shaken.
ririuul a kirel el meririau; berikd el iedel a ririuul; ririur me ng ruebet a rdechel.
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smechekill, v.a.s.is to be put in order, corrected or improved.
smechekill a kirel mesmechokl; sumecheklii a rengul, sumechokl a chebirukel el mo melemalt; smecheklel.
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udisall, v.a.s.is to be hidden in bushes.
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utetkall, v.a.s.(plant) is to be supported by stick put into ground; (site of house, etc.) is to be marked with sticks and strings.
utetkall a kirel el mututk; locha ututk; mtetkii a rael, mtutk, utetkel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

bikodelhives or rash from allergies; allergic reaction affecting the skin.bikodelhives or rash from allergies; allergic reaction affecting the skin.
chullrain; rainy season.chullrain; rainy season.
burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.
brotechclapping; wooden paddle used as war weapon; applause; praise.bekebrotechprone to slapping.
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechasget blackened with soot or ink; (pot) get burned or discolored.
bodechcurved configuration/shape of boat.obodechcurved; (person) having back curved towards rear.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

tmuu er a rengul(something) occurs to (person)/enters (person's) mind.
bekokuii a rengulkind; generous.
blak a rengulhard-working; diligent; eager; attentive; interested in; intent upon; decided on; in favor of.
oltamet er a rengulpull at someone's heartstrings; mean a lot to someone.
omtechei a rengulget back at; do to someone as he does to you.
rengulhis/her/its heart; spirit; feeling; soul; seat of emotions.
ngmasech a rengulget angry.

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