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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

dellochel, v.r.s.dipped (and soaking in water).
dellochel a delilech.
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llebal, v.r.s.(hands) washed/dunked in water.
llebal a mla meiebal; telellib a chimal; lobal a chimal, lobelur, meleball.
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seleches, v.r.s.pecked at.
seleches a kerriu; kliok; bobai a seleches er a kiuid, sichesii; smeches.
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uldasu, v.r.s.thought about; taken into consideration.
uldasu a omdasu, omelebedebek; urrereel a rael a ngar a uldasu; udesuel a beches el skuul.
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ulekbeches, v.r.s.renovated; repaired.
ulekbeches a mle mechut e meruul el mo beches; blimam a mla mukbeches; mla mekbechesur, mla mo diak el mechut; ukbechesul.
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uluud, v.r.s.(fishnet) pulled in.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bedechekill, v.a.s.is to be thrown down (in fighting, etc.).
bedechekill a kirel el obedechakl, medecheklii a sechelil, medecheklii, klaibedechakl, bedecheklel.
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chesobel, v.a.s.(taro tubers) are to be cut.
chesobel a kirel el mecheseb; cheklii a tech er a dait, chosebii, chueseb a dait, chesebel.
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kekerongel, v.a.s.is to be watched over or guided.
kekerongel a kirel el mekekar, omes er ngii; me lak le metemall; kokerengii a blil a kelebus, kokar a bangk, mengkar, kekerengel a bang
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lechidel, v.a.s.(string; cord; wire; etc.) is to be broken.
lechidel a lechedall.
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ngisall, v.a.s.(ongraol) is to be cooked or boiled in water; (tapioca) just ripe for boiling.
ngisall a kirel el mengiokl; ngisall a ongraol er a kebesengei el diokang.
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rechuul, v.a.s.is to be moved, readied or set in order.
rechuul a kirel el merech; udesuall, siokel a rolel, rochur a blil a melekdik a delengchokl; rechuul a delengcheklel.
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tkael, v.a.s.is to be cut or measured.
tkael a debokl; kirel el metuk; tukur a kerrekar; duebes, tmuk, meluk a idungel; tkul a idungel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
bekngiukmold; (food) moldy/mildewed.bekngiukmold; (food) moldy/mildewed.
iudoraiburent-a-car; U-drive car.iudoraibu (woman) loose or fast.
smuuchscorpion fish (hardly moves in water).smuuch(person) calm, placid, or unperturbed by problems or challenging circumstances.
katuucat.bekekatuusmell of a cat.
tutkwart on sole of foot; disease of kebui leaves.tutkpointer; pole (for picking fruit).
chemadechcoconut sap.chemadechcoconut sap.
beraomfish kept until slightly spoiled and then wrapped and barbequed.beraom (fish) slightly spoiled.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
bltkil a rengulone's affection/concern for.
olsarech er a rengulhold in or control emotions, anger etc.
Rengulbaititle of chiefs in Imeliik.
mengeokl er a rengulburden; bother; cause concern; weigh on.
bletengel a rengulnonchalance; laziness.
bekokuii a rengulkind; generous.
rrau a rengulconfused/puzzled by/about.

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