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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

belluchel, v.r.s.mixed; dissolved.
belluchel a mla obulech, chelui, blulech, mlechii, mulech a ilumel a belluchel
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klub, v.r.s.(coconuts) paired or coupled.
klub a klbael; mla mekub, mengub a lius, teblo el kakub, remeloik a klbael; kuub a lius.
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llik, v.r.s.(bottom of pot, basket) lined with leaves.
llik a ngar er ngii a lkil; mla melik; likir a chelais, lmik a blil a kall.
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telubech, v.r.s.masturbated; circumcised.
telubech a mla metubech; nglubech.
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ulechem, v.r.s.(fish or tapioca) tied and wrapped.
ulechem a mla mochem; mla mechem a ngikel; odoim a ulechem el ngikel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chisemesemall, v.a.s.is to be embraced or hugged.
chisemesemall a kirel el mochull; mechisemesem, mechulii a ngalek, choisemesemii a ngelekel, megisemesem er a bechil, chisemesemel.
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ngimersall, v.a.s.is to be extracted; is to be picked or pulled out.
ngimersall a kirel el mengmors; melmors a ochur; ngimersii a kot, ngimors, ngimersel.
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ochisall, v.a.s.is to be emptied.
ochisall a kirel el mochis; diak el ochisall a ollumel, di kirel el ngar ngii a ilumel; ochisir a klengoes.
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oechedall, v.a.s.is to be rushed against.
oechedall a kirel el moeached; omech; orreched; orechudel; oechedii, oechedall a dolech, oechedel.
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riokel, v.a.s.is to be swept.
riokel a kirel el meriik; besbas a riokel; riekii a blai; remiik a besbas; rikel a rael.
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techelekill, v.a.s.is to be moved or pushed up and away; is to be cleared.
techelekill a kirel el metechelokl; kirel el metemotem a oreomel; melechelokl er a kedidai; rullii el mo moded; tucheleklii a chutem; techeleklel.
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tekiungel, v.a.s.needs to be talked to; (person) is being talked about (because of bad behavior, etc.).
tekiungel a kirel el mo er ngii a tekoi; soadel er a beluu, tekiungel er a beluu er a omengubs.el sers.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chadliver.chedengaolsick with jaundice.
chaseborash.chasebohaving rash or prickly heat.
katuucat.bekekatuusmell of a cat.
kobengodelvery strong current.kobengodelvery strong current.
chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).chermallPalauan money in form of green or blue glass beads.
chemaiongdragonfly.chemaiong prone to moving from one boyfriend or girlfriend to another.
tebotebjagged projectile.oudertebotebjagged.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
beltik a rengulbetik a rengul
mekngit er a rengulnot good for; not all right with.
merirem er a rengulhurt someone's feelings.
belalk a rengulfeel shame/fright.
mengurt a rengulhurt (feelings); make (someone) despair.
dechal a rengul perseverance; ambition; strong will.
olsarech er a rengulhold in or control emotions, anger etc.

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