Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blekesangch, v.r.s.forced open; pulled apart by force.
blekesangch a mla obekesangch, obok, mekesengchii a chesimer.
See also:
chelat, v.r.s.praised.
See also:
telebtib, v.r.s.broken up into small pieces.
telebtib a mla metebtib; tibtib a kall; meruul el mo mekekerei; melebtib, tebtib, tbetbil.
See also:
terrekakl, v.r.s.abused; not taken care of; carelessness.
terrekakl a diak el ulekedmokl; terrekakl el ngalek a diak le cheleoch; meterekakl er ngii; terrekeklel.
See also:
ulluut, v.r.s.returned; sent back.
ulluut a mla moluut; mla mengader; udoud a ulluut, olutii, oluut, olutel a udoud.
See also:
ulteremed, v.r.s.pressed down; crushed.
ulteremed a mla moteremed; marek el sausab a ulteremed; blet, otermedel.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chisisall, v.a.s.are to be piled up one on top of the other.
chisisall a meleket; kirel el mechisois; choisisii, choisois a babier, mengisois er a blil, chisisel a blai.
See also:
keltall, v.a.s.is to be cooled.
See also:
odimall, v.a.s.is to have odoim added to it; is to be given odoim.
See also:
oterebekall, v.a.s.is to be raped.
oterebekall a kirel el moterebek; mekull ng diak el oterebekall a rechad; oterebekii, oterebekel.
See also:
serechall, v.a.s.is to be cleansed/bathed in hot water.
serechall a serochel; kirel el mesarech, smarech a cheluib el mo toluk, serechel a cheluib.
See also:
sibesongel, v.a.s.is to be tripped or hindered.
sibesongel a olibesongel; ngii di le ngera el melibas; tetuk el kerrekar a sibesongel er a rael; mesaik el chad a sibesongel er a urreor.
See also:
tibengedaol, v.a.s.(female) is to have sexual intercourse from rear.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
berdlip.berdaol (fish, people) thick-lipped.
rubakelder; old man; chief; foreign man; boyfriend; husband.bekerubaksmell like an old man.
chudelgrass.chudelgrass.
chelechelouldandruff.chelecheloulhaving dandruff.
britelshakiness; jitters.britelshakiness; jitters.
uidfruit that has fallen off the tree on its own.udall(fishnet) is to be pulled in.
rekungland crab.bekerekungsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs, etc.).

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
dmolech a rengulwise; prudent; careful in planning ahead.
chelimimii a rengulsullen; obstinate; uncooperative.
medengelii a rengulregain consciousness (after a faint or stroke); (person) self-confident or self-assured; (person) knowing his abilities or capacities.
meleolt a rengul(person) carefree or nonchalant; (person) not easily disturbed or content to let things happen as they may.
kie a rengul calm down; stop worrying.
mengeokl er a rengulburden; bother; cause concern; weigh on.
seitak a rengul(person is) very choosy; picky.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.157.200.1','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')