Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blades, v.r.s.arranged; lined up; displayed.
See also:
delebedebek, v.r.s.thought about; remembered.
See also:
rrisu, v.r.s.washed or rinsed off.
See also:
telechui, v.r.s.(anus) wiped.
telechui a seluld; mla metechui a btil a ngalek, tuchui, melechui, techiul.
See also:
telouch, v.r.s.(leaves, weeds etc.) cut for compost.
telouch a mla metouch; tmouch a ramek; melouch a dui, touchii, tuchel.
See also:
ulekesiu, v.r.s.copied; imitated; made the same.
ulekesiu a meruul el mo ua ngii; mla mokesiu; mekesiur a bilel er a bilek; omekesiu a llecheklel a sensei; okesiul.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bedesall, v.a.s.is to be arranged/lined up/displayed.
bedesall a kirel el obades; bedukl; omechobech; omades er a rengalek, mades, bedesel.
See also:
imekill, v.a.s.is to be loosened.
imekill a kirel el mo mimokl; imeklii a delibuk, mo diak le kes a lechetel a chim, imeklel.
See also:
kesadel, v.a.s.is to be decreased or reduced.
See also:
kimtengall, v.a.s.is to be grabbed and thrown down; is to be overpowered.
kimetengall a kirel mekimut; koimetengii, mitekelengii, nguu el tilechii.
See also:
ngebtall, v.a.s.(newborn baby) is to have membrane washed off.
See also:
odkelall, v.a.s.is to be made to move; (person) is to be made active.
odkelall a kirel el modikel; mesaik a odkelall, odkelii; rullii el mo ouedikel; odkelel.
See also:
reall, v.a.s.(particular distance) is to be walked, traveled or covered.
reall a kirel el merael; ng reall a kekemanget e mochu er a Ngerechelong; remolii.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
bisechwild taro (makes mouth itchy).bisechfish with black and yellow stripes (makes mouth itchy).
bengtpurple colored sweet potato.bengtpurple.
tedobech(one) half.tedobech(one) half.
chelucheb(taro or banana) leaf or bag used for covering food being cooked; type of coral which grows on top of or covers other corals.chellobelcovered; shady.
chedechuulknack/magical power for doing things; blueprint; plan (for house, bai, etc).chedechuulknack/magical power for doing things; blueprint; plan (for house, bai, etc).
temamuuimaginary ghost with ugly face.temamuuimaginary ghost with ugly face.
semumtrochus.semumtrochus.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
merat a renguldeeply disappointed or hurt.
becheremremangel a rengulgreedy; stingy.
merael a rengulindecisive.
olsarech er a rengulhold in or control emotions, anger etc.
melai er a rengulpersuade.
seselk a rengulbored; impatient.
kie a rengul calm down; stop worrying.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.80.248.78','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')