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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blengob, v.r.s.has had pelvis moved back and forth against it.
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cheltekill, v.r.s.held or led by the hand; carried; towed; persuaded; carrying something.
cheltekill a cheltakl, mengetakl.
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rrukem, v.r.s.(object) broken into pieces.
rrukem a bleu; bekai a rrukem; rrukem a tkul
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selaod, v.r.s.separated; explained.
selaod a lloched; mla mesaod; diak el uldak; chebechiil a selaod; rengalek me te selaod, smodii, sodel.
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selechosech, v.r.s.(solid food) bitten into; (head) to closely shorn.
selechosech a kliok; mla mesechosech; kukau a selechosech; suchesechii; klard, sechesechel a kukau.
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ulchoud, v.r.s.looked for.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bekesengchall, v.a.s.is to be forced open/pulled apart by force.
bekesengchall a kirel el obekesangch, obok, mekesengchii a chesimer, mekengii, bekesengchel.
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ksmedall, v.a.s.(fish) is to be choked.
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ngedall, v.a.s.is to be seen/sent off; is to be returned/sent back; (bride) is to be brought to prospective husband's family.
ngedall a kirel mengader; ngedall er a blil a chebechiil; ngoderii a ngelekel; merader a lleng el olekang; ngederel.
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otongall, v.a.s.is to be included.
otongall a kirel el motoi; oltoi, oldak, blengur a otongall a ongraol me a kliou me a rodech me a iasai er ngii; otongel.
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uchelall, v.a.s.is to be started or begun.
uchelall a kirel el meuchel; otutall; urreor a uchelall, mechelii a omelaml; muchel, uchelel.
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udiuul, v.a.s.is to be pulled in.
udiuul a kirel el mudai; mengurs er ngii el oba udai; omdai er ngii; telemall el ert a udiuul.
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ukdebechall, v.a.s.(plant) is to be cultivated; (business, etc.) is to be established or started.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
singodor of sperm.besingsmell of sperm; smell unclean (esp., used in insults referring to women).
cheremrumtype of sea cucumber; trepang.bekecheremrumsmell of sea cucumber.
otangcheek.bekotangelhave fat cheeks.
bekngiukmold; (food) moldy/mildewed.bekngiukmold; (food) moldy/mildewed.
uloechspear(?).uloech(person) in a hurry to go somewhere.
cheballwhite-leafed taro (yautia); gray/white hair.cheballgray-haired; white-haired.
besbastrash; rubbish; litter; debris.mekesbesiil

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
blosech a rengulhaving strange feelings about; be suspicious of.
ungil er a rengulfine or all right with.
ralmetaoch a rengulinsensitive; not easily affected; easygoing; casual; prone to avoiding responsibility.
betachel a rengulis to be pleased/satisfied/appeased; content.
outekangel er a rengulpersevere; force (oneself) to do something.
nguibes a renguldesirous of; lusting after.
omichoech a rengul(stomach) grumble, talk or gurgle (especially from hunger); (person) feel excited.

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