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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blechobech, v.r.s.put into straight line or row.
blechobech a mla obechobech beldukl, mechebechii, mechobech, blechebechel a klobak.
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bliou, v.r.s.put down; discarded; left behind.
bliou a mla obiou; omiou, miungii, miou a idungel, koididai, chelddull.
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chelisb, v.r.s.(food, liquid, dirt, etc.) having been scooped or spooned out.
chelisb a mla mechisb; nglai er a ongisb, chisbii, chuisb a kall, chesbel.
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chellooch, v.r.s.masturbated.
chellooch a mla mechelooch; mengelooch a odoim le ng diak ongraol, chelochel.
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ileakl, v.r.s.separated; separate; set apart; removed; disassociated; special.
ileakl a mla meakl; diak luldak; meleakl, ileakl a beches er a mechut, ileklel.
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llechet, v.r.s.tied; wrapped; kept occupied or busy.
llechet a selaur; mla melechet; llechotel, rrengodel, lochetii, lmechet, lechetel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bdechall, v.a.s.is to be vomited on.
bdechall a kirel el obudech, otobed a kllel, mudech a kllel, mdechii; kirel el omudech; mdechel.
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besebesechall, v.a.s.is to be continually contradicted/opposed.
besebesechall a kirel el obosech; mesechii, torebengii, omesebosech er ngii.
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chedechedechaol, v.a.s.is to be talked about or discussed.
chedechedechaol a kirel el mo rengii a tekoi; kirel el mechedecheduch; chedechedechaol el kirel a betok el ngodech el omerellel.
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kekuul, v.a.s.is to be pinched; having long nails or claws.
kekuul a kirel el mekuk; kukur, menguk er ngii, kmuk a otengel; diak le kekuul a ngalek.
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okedeldaol, v.a.s.is to be carried or transmitted with care; fragile; (person, thing, matter, problem) delicate; (person, situation) requiring special care.
okedeldaol a kirel el kerekikl er ngii; mukedelad; meringel kedmekill; ngalek a okedeldaol, mekedeldar, mekedelad, okedeldal a ngalek.
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techetechall, v.a.s.is to be pounded.
techetechall a kirel el metechotech; melechotech er a chemang; omeu er ngii.
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tkael, v.a.s.is to be cut or measured.
tkael a debokl; kirel el metuk; tukur a kerrekar; duebes, tmuk, meluk a idungel; tkul a idungel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechasget blackened with soot or ink; (pot) get burned or discolored.
burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.
chaisnews.merael a chiselwell-known; famous; infamous; (person) popular. (news) spreading quickly.
klukuktomorrow; the next or following day.klukuk be tomorrow; be the next or following day.
rirfallen leaves of kebui.merir(leaves) yellow.
beraomfish kept until slightly spoiled and then wrapped and barbequed.beraom (fish) slightly spoiled.
cherouwhite mushroom; white scar.cherouwhite mushroom; white scar.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
medengelii a rengulregain consciousness (after a faint or stroke); (person) self-confident or self-assured; (person) knowing his abilities or capacities.
ultebechel a rengulhonest; mature and responsible.
bletengel a rengulnonchalance; laziness.
olsebek er a rengulworry (unintentionally); startle.
mesbeda a rengul(person) come to realize or accept (fact, etc.).
oltamet er a rengulpull at someone's heartstrings; mean a lot to someone.
klou a rengulpatient; confident.

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