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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blachel, v.r.s.(firewood) split.
blachel a blechall; telutiud el mekekeriei, mla obachel, mechelii, machel a idungel.
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chelimkomk, v.r.s.covered over with (blanket, cloth, leaves, etc.).
chelimkomk a mla mechimkomk; ilebeb, delekedek er a bar, choimkemkii, choimkomk, chimkemkel.
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delilech, v.r.s.dipped (and removed from water).
delilech a mla medilech; ngar er a ralm; dellochel, selokel a delilech , dilechii, dmilech, delechel a selokel.
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delsbai, v.r.s.spat out or at.
delsbai a mla medesbai; mla metub, telub, dusbir a ulaol, kesib a rengul a melsbai a klalo, desbil.
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telkakl, v.r.s.propped up; supported; kneeling.
telkakl a delisakl; mla metkakl me ng mesisiich; tukeklii a blai, tukakl a chimal er a tebel; tkeklel.
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ulcholt, v.r.s.shown; revealed.
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ulekedelad, v.r.s.carried or transmitted with care; (person or animal) spoiled.
ulekedelad a ungil el kldmokl; diak el terrekakl; ngalek a ungil el ulekedelad a okerulel; mla mukedelad.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bereberall, v.a.s.is to be snatched, grabbed or seized; (land) is to be captured.
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cheseangel, v.a.s.is to be assisted by contribution of food or labor.
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edongel, v.a.s.is to be coaxed into doing something; is to be flattered/whetted/sharpened; easily flattered.
edongel a chad el di beot el mo oumera a diak le mera el chetengakl; edengii, edengel.
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sebechekill, v.a.s.is to be defended or helped.
sebechekill a kirel el mesebechakl, sobecheklii, odesebii, ngoseuir, buik a sebechekill, sebecheklel.
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tebetball, v.a.s.(long object) is to be divided or split into small pieces, strips, etc.
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tetkall, v.a.s.is to be pointed at or appointed.
tetkall a kirel el metutk; tutkii a bobai; tmutk a mengur; tetkel.
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tngekill, v.a.s.is to be appeased or consoled
tngekill a kirel el metngakl; kirel el mengunguuch; tingeklii a rengul a meltord; locha tngakireng; tngeklel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
cheludechwooden float for fish net; light weight wood used to make corks.cheludech(wood) dried out (and light in weight).
siktcluster/bunch of fruit.berikt(tree) productive or bearing much fruit.
chiechabhole; hollow; cavity (in tooth).mechiechab(teeth) full of cavities.
otekliklvertical support beam for buadel whose bottom end lis on imuul.oteklikllying down with feet in air.
kobengodelvery strong current.kobengodelvery strong current.
chemadechcoconut sap.chemadechcoconut sap.
chelsebengoshandsomeness.chesbengoshandsome; beautiful.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
mereng er a rengulplease; go along with (so as not to hurt feelings).
mederdirk a rengulfeel scorn for.
merirem er a rengulhurt someone's feelings.
omerteret a rengulfed up or exasperated with.
oltamet er a rengulpull at someone's heartstrings; mean a lot to someone.
mesisiich a rengulstrong-willed; motivated; determined; hard-working.
medemedemek a rengul kind; generous.

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