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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

cheldellumel, v.r.s.(tapioca) cooked.
chedellumel a mla mechedellumel; chedellumel el tuu.
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cheleklachel, v.r.s.cleaned by shaking with water inside; shaken.
cheleklachel a mla mecheklachel; choklechelii a ilumel, choklachel, mengklachel, cheklechelel.
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chelerrumet, v.r.s.washed or pumped out.
chelerrumet a mla mecherumet; nglatech, churemetii a olekang, churumet, cheremetel.
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klad, v.r.s.(sea cucumber) rolled/rubbed in ashes (to remove bad-tasting outer membrane).
klad er a chutem; a di dechudech el ta el chad. klad a mla mekad; kodir, kmad, mengad a cheremrum el mlai a mekoll er ngii; kedil.
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seluub, v.r.s.studied; learned; imitated.
seluub a mla mesuub; suub a chelitakl; suebii a ngloik; suebel
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ulekmad, v.r.s.(debt) repaid; (favor) returned.
ulekmad a mla mukmad; mla mekmad a bled el udoud; ukmedal.
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uliit, v.r.s.deflected; turned away.
uliit a mla moiit; mla imiit er a rael; diak lokiu a rolel; cheleuid a osisecheklel er a ochur a uliit, ietel a osisechakl.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chebuul, v.a.s.is to be given gift (sometimes, out of pity); is to be bribed.
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chedechall, v.a.s.is to have glow cast upon it.
chedechall a kirel el obtanget el mo mengeldoech; toluk a chedechall, cheldoech, cheldechel.
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kereoll, v.a.s.is to be rolled.
kereoll a kirel el mekereel; korelii, mengereel a suld, koreel a suld; kerelel a suld.
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odekedekall, v.a.s.is to be chased or run after; is to be caught with or fought (with).
odekedekall a kirel el modekedek; kirel el moreked; orekedii, odekedekii a merechorech, odekedek, odekedekel.
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odekiaol, v.a.s.are to be added together, unified or joined.
odekiaol a kirel el modak; oldak, uldak, odekiar, odak a kakerous el uldasu; reng a odekiaol, diak lodekial el chad.
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okdengerechall, v.a.s.is to be placed or set rightside up; is to be turned face up.
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tebakel, v.a.s.is to be patched; (fine) is to be paid.
tebakel a kirel el metabek; tuabek a selodel el bail; tobekii, tebekel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
maiscorn.maisblond.
bausmell; odor; scent.bekebau(cooked meat or fish, cooking pot, etc.) foul-smelling.
chedechuulknack/magical power for doing things; blueprint; plan (for house, bai, etc).chedechuulingenious; clever; inventive.
chudelgrass.chudelgrass.
burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.burachedhaving skin covered with white spots.
kekeuathlete's foot; tinea.kekeuhaving athlete's foot.
cheballwhite-leafed taro (yautia); gray/white hair.cheballgray-haired; white-haired.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
urrengulelurungulel
oubuch a rengultreat person as if he or she were one's spouse.
bebeot a rengulrather undecided about something; not taking something too seriously.
medecherecher a rengul stubborn; adamant; not easily swayed.
belalk a rengulfeel shame/fright.
omal er a rengulastonish; amaze; impress; cause admiration.
luut er a rengulanything causing one to lose one's resolve.

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