Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blakes, v.r.s.(leg) moved to walk.
blakes a mla obakes; mekesii, blakes a cheroid, blekeklel
See also:
selchesech, v.r.s.stuffed; (gun) cocked or set.
See also:
selib, v.r.s.(ground) broken, plowed or dug.
selib a mla mesib; sibur; sers a selib; mesib, sbul; ulecholo.
See also:
ulekerreu, v.r.s.(person or animal) taken care of or protected; obeyed; cared about; respected; obedient.
ulekerreu a klaubeltik el reng; kelatk, omecheliu a rechad; omekerreu a klauchd; ulekerreuil.
See also:
ulengim, v.r.s.given drink; made to drink.
ulengim a mla mongim; mngelmii a ngalek; omngim, ungelmel a ngalek.
See also:
urreteret, v.r.s.(desire) suppressed; pushed into ground.
urretert a ulsarech er eou; mla mo rotert; mla me er eou a rengul; orrenges a tekoi kung; ortertii a dengerenger; orretert er tir; ortertel
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bichall, v.a.s.is to be sifted or filtered.
bichall a biochel; kirel el obiich, michii, osiik, omiich a tekoi, bichel a klemerang.
See also:
kekedall, v.a.s.(debt) is to be paid.
See also:
okesengall, v.a.s.is to be tightened.
okesengall a kirel el mokes; okesengii a lechet, okes; okesengel.
See also:
sechesechall, v.a.s.(solid food) is to be bitten into.
See also:
sechudel, v.a.s.temporarily crippled (by muscle cramp, etc.).
sechudel a rekdel a ouach; mekngit el merael; tingoi a ochil; sechedelel.
See also:
teketokel, v.a.s.is to be constructed, assembled or put together.
teketokel a kirel el meteketek meleketek er ngii; teketokel a kall; toketekii a blai; teketekel.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
choalechsea urchin.choalechsea urchin.
H.O.(abbrev.) Babeldaob (used pejoratively).H.O.(abbrev.) Babeldaob (used pejoratively).
builmoon; month.buil moon-shaped.
chemanglarge sea or mangrove crab; Samoan crab.bekechemangsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs).
diulareng(someone's) happiness/joy.dmeuhappy; glad; joyful; appreciative.
meduumale genitals (large).meduubreadfruit.
rubakelder; old man; chief; foreign man; boyfriend; husband.bekerubaksmell like an old man.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
medemedemek a rengul kind; generous.
dechal a rengul perseverance; ambition; strong will.
doaoch a rengulindecisive; fickle; inconsistent; prone to changing one's mind.
rengul a cheluch dregs of coconut oil.
omsa a llechul a rengulteach (someone) a lesson.
dmeu a rengulhappy; glad; joyful; appreciative.
klou er a renguldetermined.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.198.143.210','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')