Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

cheleld, v.r.s.knocked out of breath.
cheleld a mla mecheld, chad el ruebet el metilech me ng meengel a telil; mo kedeb a telil.
See also:
chelemochem, v.r.s.urinated on.
chelemochem a mla mechemochem; chumechemii, mengemochem er a ulaol, chemechemel.
See also:
selam, v.r.s.thrust at.
selam a mla mesam; somur, selam a chimal el omekdakd; omekiam.
See also:
teleketek, v.r.s.constructed; assembled; put together.
teleketek a teleketokel; mla meteketek; teleketek a blil; blil a chachisois. toketek a kall, teketekel.
See also:
ultengel, v.r.s.taken or brought down.
ultengel a mla motengel; ngar eou; diak lulengasech.
See also:
ultuull, v.r.s.carried on the back; held behind the back; carrying (person, thing) on the back; holding (hands) behind the back.
ultuull a ultour; ultuull er a ngelekel, oltour er a til.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bengkengkall, v.a.s.is to be laid on ground.
bengkengkall a kirel el obengkangk; mengkengkii a bambuu, mengkangk a kerrekar, mo blengkangk, bengkengkel.
See also:
chedermotall, v.a.s.(water) is to be stirred or agitated.
See also:
dechall, v.a.s.is to be increased or raised in amount.
See also:
orretall, v.a.s.is to be made to run.
orretall a kirel el morurt; skuul er a kldachelbai a orretall, orretii el mo ungil, orurt a osisechakl er a usaso, orretel.
See also:
semesemiil, v.a.s.is to be shaken.
See also:
skuul, v.a.s.is to be put, packed or stuffed into.
skuul a kirel el mesuk; skuul a locha er a chelsel; smuk a kukau e sukur a ngikel; skul.
See also:
utetkall, v.a.s.(plant) is to be supported by stick put into ground; (site of house, etc.) is to be marked with sticks and strings.
utetkall a kirel el mututk; locha ututk; mtetkii a rael, mtutk, utetkel.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
kltombluntness; dullness.ketom(knife, etc) blunt or dull.
kurstwitching (nervous disorder) .kurstwitching.
chelucheb(taro or banana) leaf or bag used for covering food being cooked; type of coral which grows on top of or covers other corals.chellobelprotected; sheltered.
mekealdhot water; hot drink (esp., coffee).mekealdhot water; hot drink (esp., coffee).
rechorechstealing; theft; robbery; selfishness.delibuksurechorech(knot) tied securely so as not be loosened.
iitmiss; failure.iitmiss; failure.
brakgiant yellow swamp taro.brakhaving a vagina which stays dry during sexual intercourse.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
rengul a ngaisyolk of egg.
songerenger a rengulhave a strong desire for; lust after.
mesbesubed er a rengulprepare someone (psychologically) for something; pave the way for more serious discussion with someone; inform gradually or indirectly.
mengesib er a rengul get someone angry.
mengas er a rengulastonished; surprised.
omal er a rengulastonish; amaze; impress; cause admiration.
bekongesengasech a renguleasily angered; excitable.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.196.91.84','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')