Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bldechakl, v.r.s.thrown down (in fighting, etc.); let to drop.
bldechakl a mla obedechakl; medecheklii, sechelid a beldechakl er a chutem.
See also:
kleolt, v.r.s.cooled.
See also:
telaiu, v.r.s.rubbed; smoothed over; petted.
telaiu a mla metaiu; mla toiuii a bdelul; mla tmaiu a bedengel, melaiu er ngii; tiuel a smecher.
See also:
telechiir, v.r.s.caught with a handnet.
telechiir a nglai; mla metechiir; mla obed; ticherii a iedel, tichiir a meradel, techerel.
See also:
telemtam, v.r.s.chewed.
telemtam a mla metemtam; tomtemur a odoim; tomtam a kelel; melemtam, temtemul a kall.
See also:
ulekdakt, v.r.s.frightened; scared.
See also:


Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bengoel, v.a.s.is to be covered with hand; is to be stopped up.
bengoel a kirel el obeng; mekngit a secherel a bengoel a ngerel, omeng a er a isngel er a mekngit el bau.
See also:
biongel, v.a.s.is to be divided or distributed; (hair) is to be parted.
See also:
ochebngall, v.a.s.is to be brought to surface of water.
ochebngall a kirel el mochob; mei er a bab; olechob er a mlai, ochebngii a ert el mei er a bebul a daob; ochebngel.
See also:
odimall, v.a.s.is to have odoim added to it; is to be given odoim.
See also:
odngelall, v.a.s.is to be visited.
odngelall a kirel el modingel; odngelii a smecher, odingel a blai; odngelel; omes.
See also:
otechekill, v.a.s.is to be deflected or detained.
otechekill a kirel el motechakl; metecheklii e kudmeklii a terruaol, omtechakl er a diak a blil, otecheklel.
See also:
oterebekall, v.a.s.is to be raped.
oterebekall a kirel el moterebek; mekull ng diak el oterebekall a rechad; oterebekii, oterebekel.
See also:


State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

kullcyst; tumor.kull having a cyst or tumor.
techiirhandnet with handle; cloth or screen for pressing coconut milk; sheath at base of coconut frond (used for pressing coconut milk).mekudem a techerel(person who) understands or catches everything.
cheludechwooden float for fish net; light weight wood used to make corks.cheludechwooden float for fish net; light weight wood used to make corks.
teberoishin; (large, triangle-shaped) coconut candy.teberoibow-legged.
kobesossea horse.kobesossea horse.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

medengelii a rengulregain consciousness (after a faint or stroke); (person) self-confident or self-assured; (person) knowing his abilities or capacities.
klou er a renguldetermined.
kngtil a rengul(someone's) being mean or feeling sad or frustrated.
oubuch a rengultreat person as if he or she were one's spouse.
mereng er a rengulplease; go along with (so as not to hurt feelings).
doaoch a rengulindecisive; fickle; inconsistent; prone to changing one's mind.
mengurs er a rengulattract.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')