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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blusekl, v.r.s.covered with someone's legs while sleeping.
blusekl a mla obusekl; museklii, musekl, omusekl.
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delemedemek, v.r.s.softened; weakened; tenderized; calmed.
delemedemek a rruul el medemedemek; mechitechut; diak el medecherecher; domedemekii a kall, delemedemekel.
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delidiich, v.r.s.shined upon; lighted up.
delidiich a mla medidiich; mocholt a kotel me a chelebulel; delidiich er a meteet, melidiich er ngii; didichel.
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seleches, v.r.s.pecked at.
seleches a kerriu; kliok; bobai a seleches er a kiuid, sichesii; smeches.
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selloakl, v.r.s.grabbed at and shaken or stirred.
selloakl a mla meseloakl; mla mesalo; rrutech er a betok el chim; selloakl el kall a olsecher; soleueklii; solouakl.
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uldibsobs, v.r.s.filled to overflowing; poured out.
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ulekdengarech, v.r.s.placed or set rightside up; turned face up.
ulekdengarech a mle chebecheb e mla mo dengarech; mla mekedengerechii; diak el chebecheb.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

berotel, v.a.s.is to be hidden.
berotel a kirel el obart, omart, diak el tekiungel, kngtil a chad a berotel, mertii, bertel.
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chesbungel, v.a.s.is to be scooped or spooned out.
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ksomel, v.a.s.is to be chopped with clam-shell ax.
ksomel a kirel el mekisem; mecheduib, mengisem er ngii; ksemel.
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odersall, v.a.s.is to be lifted up.
odersall a kirel modars; chim a odersall el mo er a chad el olengeseu; oderdsii, odars a chimal; odersel.
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oisechall, v.a.s.is to be shown or instructed.
oisechall a kirel el moisech; mocholt; oisech a siliseb el udoud; oisechii; ocholt; oisechel.
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tetekill, v.a.s.is to be plucked or torn off; is to be pulled at.
tetekill a kirel el metetekakl; toteklii a dui; meltekakl er ngii, totekakl a okul a ert, teteklel.
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uksoangel, v.a.s.is to be made used to or trained.
uksoangel a kirel el muksau; omeksau er ngii; meruul er ngii el mo smau, mo soal; omeksau, meksongii ngalek; ngalek a uksoangel er a urreor; uksongel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
rasechblood.rasechblood.
chudelgrass.chudelgrassy.
beraomfish kept until slightly spoiled and then wrapped and barbequed.beraomfish kept until slightly spoiled and then wrapped and barbequed.
telengtungdwild tamarind; lead tree.telengtungdwild tamarind; lead tree.
katuucat.bekekatuusmell of a cat.
temamuuimaginary ghost with ugly face.temamuuimaginary ghost with ugly face.
chemaiongdragonfly.chemaiongdragonfly.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
rengulhis/her/its heart; spirit; feeling; soul; seat of emotions.
ngoaol a rengulconfronted with and perplexed by large task or responsibility.
blak a rengulhard-working; diligent; eager; attentive; interested in; intent upon; decided on; in favor of.
melekoi a renguldetermined; well-motivated; make rasping or humming sound in the lungs; make humming moise while sleeping; (cat) purr.
derengulalso, used a as friendly expression of envy.
meched a rengulthirsty; impatient; prone to overreact; (deprived and) having strong desire for.
medecherecher a rengul stubborn; adamant; not easily swayed.

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