Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelusem, v.r.s.(mouth) wiped; (hands) wiped of dirt, food, etc.
chelusem a mla mechusem, blutek el ngor, diak lolekoi.
See also:
cheluum, v.r.s.wrapped in leaves or betel nut fiber and baked.
cheluum a cheluomel el ngikel.
See also:
iluil, v.r.s.rolled up.
iluil a mla meiuil; diak le blerk, ilii a bar; imuil a chedecholl, ilel a chedecholl.
See also:
kllikl, v.r.s.tickled.
kllikl a omenglikl; kileklii a chebesal; kellikl a ocherechur; menglikl.
See also:
ulechadu, v.r.s.cut with scissors; picked up with tongs.
ulechadu a mla mochadu; delebes er a ochadu, mecheduii, mechadu a mamed, ocheduel a bail.
See also:
ulekesiu, v.r.s.copied; imitated; made the same.
ulekesiu a meruul el mo ua ngii; mla mokesiu; mekesiur a bilel er a bilek; omekesiu a llecheklel a sensei; okesiul.
See also:
ulsebek, v.r.s.made to fly.
ulsebek a mla mosebek; malk a ulsebek, mla suebek; osebekii, osebek a skoki.
See also:


Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

chemedongall, v.a.s.are to be welcomed or called together.
See also:
chideball, v.a.s.is to be hung onto with hands.
chideball a kirel el mechidobel, chimal a chedam a chideball er a rengelekel, choidebelii er a demal, mengidobel, chidebelel.
See also:
odengesall, v.a.s.is to be praised or honored; praiseworthy.
odengesall a kirel a chetengakl; kirel el modanges; odengesii a ungil merreder; odanges, odengesel.
See also:
tebakel, v.a.s.is to be patched; (fine) is to be paid.
tebakel a kirel el metabek; tuabek a selodel el bail; tobekii, tebekel.
See also:
tiuall, v.a.s.is to be rubbed or smoothed over or petted.
tiuall a kirel el metaiu; melaiu er ngii; toiuii a chimal; tmaiu a bedengel; tiuel.
See also:
tuidel, v.a.s.is to be cut lengthwise or down the middle.
tuidel a kirel metiud; meliud er ngii; tiuedii a bobai; tmiud a brak, tudel.
See also:
uterechall, v.a.s.is to be bent and tied.
uterechall a kirel el muturech; omturech a ukar; mturech a ungamk, uterechel.
See also:


State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

kobesossea horse.kobesossea horse.
teberoishin; (large, triangle-shaped) coconut candy.teberoibow-legged.
klukuktomorrow; the next or following day.klukuktomorrow; the next or following day.
meduumale genitals (large).meduubreadfruit.
tutaumorning; this morning.tutaube morning.
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechashaving the qualities of an old woman.
chelechedsmall sea crab.chelechedsmall sea crab.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

rengulhis/her/its heart; spirit; feeling; soul; seat of emotions.
ngelem a rengulsmart; clever; having a retentive memory.
seselk a rengulbored; impatient.
melekoi a renguldetermined; well-motivated; make rasping or humming sound in the lungs; make humming moise while sleeping; (cat) purr.
ochemchuml a rengulseething inside with anger or hate.
melai er a rengulpersuade.
rengul a kerrekarcenter/core of tree.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')