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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

berruud, v.r.s.torn/pulled off.
berruud a mla oberuud; nglubet el cheroid, mla meruud a chesimer, berudel.
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blidokl, v.r.s.cast or tossed (e.g. fishnet); thrown underhand (as in softball); thrown out(side); located far from others (as if tossed away).
blidokl a mla obidokl; blides, mideklii, midokl, bideklel.
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cheldechuul, v.r.s.fixed; arranged.
cheldechuul a mengedechuul; mengituuk el osiik a rolel el mo ungil, chodechulii me ng mo er a skuul, chudechuul.
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delengmes, v.r.s.respected; honored.
delengmes a mla medengmes; mla ngmai a chetengakl; mla morenges e modanges, dengmesioll a delengmes
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kluk, v.r.s.pinched.
kluk a mla mekuk; menguk a bedengel, kukur a otengel; mla kmuk a chimal.
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telbotb, v.r.s.(long object) divided or split into small pieces, strips.
telbotb a mla metbotb; tibetbii a olukl, melbotb a besebes; tibotb, tbetbel.
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ulterekokl, v.r.s.entrusted to someone; given for safekeeping; (specific time) set; sincere, real; genuine; really; surely; for sure; definitely.
ulterekokl a mla moterekokl; ultebechel el kmal ngii; mloterekokl el mengkar a chutem; oterekeklii a omerolel, oterekokl a okelel a babii er ngii; ulterekeklel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

debachel, v.a.s.is to be chopped down.
debachel a kirel el medobech; medebes, metuk, dobesii, dobechii a kerrekar, duobech a bambuu, melobech a ngikel,
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kersall, v.a.s.is to be pulled, towed or dragged.
kersall a krukl; kirel el mekurs; kursii a mlai, otemetii, kmurs a kerrekar.
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okedeldaol, v.a.s.is to be carried or transmitted with care; fragile; (person, thing, matter, problem) delicate; (person, situation) requiring special care.
okedeldaol a kirel el kerekikl er ngii; mukedelad; meringel kedmekill; ngalek a okedeldaol, mekedeldar, mekedelad, okedeldal a ngalek.
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osichall, v.a.s.(nut, screw) is to be tightened.
osichall a kirel el mosiich, osiich a seraub, osichii a rengul er a soal el kall, osichel.
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sechudel, v.a.s.temporarily crippled (by muscle cramp, etc.).
sechudel a rekdel a ouach; mekngit el merael; tingoi a ochil; sechedelel.
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techekill, v.a.s.is to be deflected; is to be inserted (and held firmly).
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techetechall, v.a.s.is to be pounded.
techetechall a kirel el metechotech; melechotech er a chemang; omeu er ngii.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

kobesossea horse.kobesos (head) long, narrow or pointed.
chelechedsmall sea crab.chelechedarea of shallow water (usually exposed at low tide and good for fishing).
ngulasthma.ngulasthmatic; suffering from a bout of asthma.
telengtungdwild tamarind; lead tree.telengtungdwoven with small weave.
kemangetlength (of string, etc.) which exceeds what is needed or expected.kemangetlength (of string, etc.) which exceeds what is needed or expected.
bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

kesib a rengulangry.
ouuchel er a rengulregret.
bliochel a rengulsincere; open-minded.
olturk a rengulsatiate; make someone give up (from fatigue); get one's fill of; insult continuously or mercilessly; let someone really have it.
mekikiid a rengulunsympathetic; uncaring; uninvolved; emotionless.
melamet er a renguldo things as one pleases.
ultebechel a rengulhonest; mature and responsible.

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