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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

cheldellumel, v.r.s.(tapioca) cooked.
chedellumel a mla mechedellumel; chedellumel el tuu.
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chelold, v.r.s.farted at.
chelold a mla mechold; choldii, chemold, cheldel.
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cherroid, v.r.s.removed to a distance; moved away.
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delangch, v.r.s.set aside; recognized; mounded.
delangch mla medangch er a chutem; beluut er a chutem; rullii el mo mengerengird, dongchii a tuu; dmangch, dengchel.
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ulekdinges, v.r.s.made full; satisifed.
ulekdinges a ungil el ulekang; chuodel a kldmokl e medinges; diak el sengerenger; mla mukdinges; ukdngesel.
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ulekeroul, v.r.s.raised; cultivated.
ulekeroul a mla mukeroul; ungil a ulekerulel; ungil el ulekeroul a omekdubech er a ungil buai.
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ulserechakl, v.r.s.stepped on (and giving off sound).
ulserechakl a klou a rengul; ulsarech a rengul; diak el beot el ngmasech a rengul; ulserecheklel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bekesall, v.a.s.(leg) is to be moved to walk.
bekesall a sebechel el obakes el imuu er ngii, makes, mekesii, bekesel.
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berechall, v.a.s.is to be dipped into sauce, etc..
berechall a kirel el obarech, merechii, marech a chimal er a ralm, berechel.
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beremall, v.a.s.(fish) is to be allowed to spoil slightly before wrapping and barbequeing.
beremall a kirel el mukberaom, mo beraom; beremel el ngikel.
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dbaol, v.a.s.is to be bombed or dynamited.
dbaol a kirel el medub er a dub; melub, klou el risois a dbaol, dubar, duub, omriid er ngii el oba dub.
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kitall, v.a.s.is to be pressed with fingers and massaged; is to be pressed against surface with fingers; is to be softened.
kitall a kirel mekit; mengit er ngii; omet el mesisiich.
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oremoll, v.a.s.is to be urged or forced.
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otngekill, v.a.s.is to be rejected, returned, declined or pushed back.
otngekill a kirel el motngakl, oltngakl e rngii, otngakl; otngeklel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.chadliver.
tutaumorning; this morning.tutaumorning; this morning.
tengolldownward slope; descent.tengolldownward slope; descent.
bangikoibutterfly; moth.bangikoibutterfly; moth.
kodalldeath.diak a kodelleleternal; everlasting.
chedechuulknack/magical power for doing things; blueprint; plan (for house, bai, etc).chedechuulknack/magical power for doing things; blueprint; plan (for house, bai, etc).
bengtpurple colored sweet potato.bengtpurple colored sweet potato.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
omai er a rengulhesitate; be unsure about.
omal er a rengulastonish; amaze; impress; cause admiration.
cheldeng a rengulconfused; surprised; stubborn; dull-witted; slow (in understanding).
merechorech a rengulselfish; greedy; stingy.
merusech a rengulrepentant.
ngoaol a rengulconfronted with and perplexed by large task or responsibility.
melaok a renguladulterous; acquisitive.

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