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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelado, v.r.s.roofed.
chelado a mla mechado; cheldool, chodeuii, chemado a blai.
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chelderuar, v.r.s.stirred; agitated; mixed up; (person) stunned or temporarily disoriented (typically due to having been struck in the head); (person) drunk; intoxicated; inebriated.
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llud, v.r.s.having had sexual intercourse.
llud a mla ludur; melud er ngii.
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telngakl, v.r.s.appeased; consoled.
telngakl a mla mengunguuch; mla metngakl; tingeklii a rengul a meltord; tngeklel a rengul er a udoud.
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ulekoad, v.r.s.killed.
ulekoad a uleldechelakl; okoad.
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ulengesechekl, v.r.s.(pants, etc.) pulled up; moved up to particular position; praised; elevated.
ulengesechekl a ulengeriakl.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bedachel, v.a.s.(canoe, boat, etc.) is to have curve made in it.
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cholodall, v.a.s.is to be comforted or consoled.
cholodall a kirel el mechelaod, mengelaod.
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kitall, v.a.s.is to be pressed with fingers and massaged; is to be pressed against surface with fingers; is to be softened.
kitall a kirel mekit; mengit er ngii; omet el mesisiich.
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ocheroall, v.a.s.(turtle) is to be turned face up; (clothes) are to be turned inside out.
ocheroall a kirel el mochero; mechereuii, uel a ocheroall; mo dengarech; ocherouel.
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redekekill, v.a.s.(distance) is to be jumped.
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temikel, v.a.s.is to be shaved or scraped.
temikel a kirel el mengai; kirel el metamk; tomkii; tuamk a chesemel.
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ungkill, v.a.s.is to be named.
ungkill a kirel el mungakl; mngeklii, loia a ngklel; omngakl er ngii; tolechoi a ungkill.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

chimhand; arm; front paws (of animal); help; assistance; manual labor; person sent to help.chimhand; arm; front paws (of animal); help; assistance; manual labor; person sent to help.
tebekbukrayfish.tebekbuk(skin of shin) rough.
olechutellarge bamboo raftolechutellarge bamboo raft
chedechuulknack/magical power for doing things; blueprint; plan (for house, bai, etc).chedechuulknack/magical power for doing things; blueprint; plan (for house, bai, etc).
silssun; day.bekesils(boys) smell sweaty or gamey (after perspiring in sun).
kesaiinsufficient quantity.kesaiinsufficient quantity.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

omult er a rengulconvince; persuade.
omerteret a rengulfed up or exasperated with.
bechecherd a rengulirascible; easily fed up with.
meses a rengulindustrious; diligent.
olengasech er a rengulmake or get (someone) angry.
kedidai a rengulstubborn; scornful; condescending.
melaok a renguladulterous; acquisitive.

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