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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

cherroakl, v.r.s.(ankle) twisted or sprained.
cherroakl a mla mocheroakl; ulechoid a ulengeruaol er a ochil, ulecheroakl.
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dellodel, v.r.s.extracted from; (feet) removed from shoes.
dellodel a mla medelodel; mla motobed er a chelsel a butiliang; duldelii a ngimes, dulodel, deldelel.
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klom, v.r.s.(branch of tree, betel nut, etc.) cut off.
klom a delebes; teluk, delebokl a chimal; klom a chimal.
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llemolem, v.r.s.(long object) laid down lengthwise; (work, schooling, etc.) completed; accomplished; (path, stream, etc.) followed; parallel.
llemolem a telamet; mla melemolem; lemelemel, lilemelemii a skuul a mlo er a ullebongel; llemolem a skulel, bambuu a llemolem er a rael.
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telemotem, v.r.s.(trees, land etc.) cleared.
telemotem a oreomel el meukel a kerrekar er ngii me ng mededaes.
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ulekesebech, v.r.s.controlled; (price) lowered.
ulekesebech a telkib el mo er a bab me a lechub eou; mla mokesebech; mekesebechii a iklel; mekesebech a oruikl e osiik a soal.
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ulengoid, v.r.s.(food) given or exchanged ceremonially; messed up; put in wrong place.
ulengoid a mla merael a betok el chim; mla mongoid a chutem; ulengoid el cheleuid a rolel; ulechoid; cheliseksikd kung; ongidii a chutem, ongoid a udoud, ongidel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

brekedall, v.a.s.(clothes) are to be hung on line, etc.
brekedall a kirel el obriked; locha er a omrekodel, mrekedii, mriked a bail, brekedel.
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chetikikall, v.a.s.is to be tempted or led astray.
chetikikall a kirel el mechetikaik; choitikikii a ngalek, mengetikaik er a mesaik el mo ourreor, chetikikel.
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ochetall, v.a.s.is to be advanced past or defeated.
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osisechekill, v.a.s.is to be taught, instructed, trained.
osisechekill a kirel el mosisechakl; osisecheklii, metitur a osischekill, osisechakl el kirel a metitur; osisecheklel.
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otekengall, v.a.s.is to be opposed or gone against.
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sengeakl, v.a.s.(odoim or rice) is to be cooked or boiled in water.
sengeakl a kirel el mesengoes; odoim a sengeakl; smongosii, songoes, melengoes, sengosel.
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tuul, v.a.s.is to be heated or cooked lightly; is to be heated so as to become bendable; is to be rubbed or massaged.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

siktcluster/bunch of fruit.berikt(tree) productive or bearing much fruit.
uesvision; sight; view.sekoesperceptive; sharp-minded; acute; sensitive; aware of one's responsibilities or surroundings; capable of looking at something thoroughly or seeing all the angles and possibilities.
cherollbirth; birthday.ulemcheroll(woman) having already borne children.
kobengodelvery strong current.kobengodelvery strong current.
cheremrumtype of sea cucumber; trepang.bekecheremrumsmell of sea cucumber.
mekealdhot water; hot drink (esp., coffee).mekealdhot water; hot drink (esp., coffee).

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

rengul a cheluch dregs of coconut oil.
omerteret a rengulfed up or exasperated with.
olseked er a rengulstick to something (without giving up); be firm.
kedidai a rengulstubborn; scornful; condescending.
ngelekel a rengulfavorite child.
merusech a rengulrepentant.
mengesib er a rengul get someone angry.

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