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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bluit, v.r.s.(sugar cane) cut.
bluit a bliatel, mla obuit; mitii, muit, deb a nglai, bitel a deb.
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chelabl, v.r.s.carried under arm.
chelabl a chelebill; mla mechabl, choblii a ngalek, chuabl a babier er ngi, cheblel.
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cheleed, v.r.s.sewn, stitched or fixed temporarily; pushed.
cheleed a mla mecheed; chemedii a mlai, chemeed a bail, mengeed, chedel a mechut el bail.
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klang, v.r.s.eaten.
klang a mla mekang; odoim a klang, kmang, kolii el rokir.
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telekuau, v.r.s.carried in cupped hands.
telekuau a kall el diak el delekedek; melekuau a betok el kall a mengeberochel.
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uldois, v.r.s.increased; added to.
uldois a mla mudois; mla morngii a dechelel; remechitechut a obdois a blingelir er a kall; udisel a kelir.
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ulngibes, v.r.s.tempted; teased; seduced.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bedechall, v.a.s.is to be picked up with fingers.
bedechall a kirel el obodech, medechii a odoim, modech a kall el olab a cheldingel.
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chetikikall, v.a.s.is to be tempted or led astray.
chetikikall a kirel el mechetikaik; choitikikii a ngalek, mengetikaik er a mesaik el mo ourreor, chetikikel.
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debdebsall, v.a.s.is to be objected to.
debdebsall a kirel el medebdobs; meterob, torebengii, dobdebsii a omerael e le ng meringel a daob e meses a eolt; debdebsel.
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kdemall, v.a.s.are to be placed close together in space or time.
kdemall a kirel mo mekudem; kudemii, kuudem a sersel a merechorech, kdemel.
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okesiaol, v.a.s.is to be compared, copied, imitated, made the same, evened out, or mixed through; is to be matched (by other half or part).
okesiaol a kirel el mokesiu; mekesiur, mekesiu, okesiul; mo osisiu.
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oridall, v.a.s.(someone's) departure is to be awaited.
oridall a kirel el moriid; mo dibus; olterau a ice a oridall er a beluu; odkikall.
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sekesekoall, v.a.s.is to be crawled or crept over.
sekesekoall a kirel el mesekesako; melekesako er ngii; kongesachel el rael a sekesekoall.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
brotechclapping; wooden paddle used as war weapon; applause; praise.bekebrotechprone to slapping.
chelechedsmall sea crab.chelechedambidextrous.
bobaipapaya tree (including fruit).bobaidull; slow-witted.
cheballwhite-leafed taro (yautia); gray/white hair.cheballgray-haired; white-haired.
chaseborash.chaseborash.
martilionghammer.martiliongclumsy; ungraceful; untalented; (person) blunt or hard-hitting (in his words).
kerisgoiter.kerisgoiter.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
medengelii a rengulregain consciousness (after a faint or stroke); (person) self-confident or self-assured; (person) knowing his abilities or capacities.
tuobed a rengulone's real feelings come out.
llemesel a rengulhis/her/its intelligence.
melemalt a rengulfair; just; understanding; good-hearted.
mengesib er a rengul get someone angry.
moalech a renguldisappointed; dismayed.
mesubed a rengulaccept; be resigned to; learn a lesson; learn from experience.

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