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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelsiau, v.r.s.assisted by contribution of food or labor.
chelsiau a mla mechesiau; chosiur, chosiau, Ngaramecherocher a chelsiau.
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klengoes, v.r.s.(odoim or rice) cooked/boiled in water.
klengoes a ulekmark el odoim; mla mesengoes a klengoes, smongoes, melengoes, sengosel.
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klumech, v.r.s.(blanket; etc.) spread out; (body) massaged; restored; message sent.
klumech a mesumech a tekoi el mo er a cheroid; a ika klmechel el eko er kau.
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rredall, v.r.s.(flowers; etc.) picked.
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telecheb, v.r.s.removed; scraped up; cut out; uprooted.
telecheb a nglai el cheroid; mla metecheb a belsiich; tuecheb a chetermall; tochebii a debsel a lius.
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urrachem, v.r.s.mixed.
urrachem a modak; diokang a urrachem.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bedesall, v.a.s.(fish) is to be boiled in water; (tongue) is to be cut.
bedesall a mereched el mo marek, modes a ngikel, bedakl el diokang.
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cheseksiktall, v.a.s.(someone) is to be involved or mixed up in.
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diesall, v.a.s.is to be removed or extracted.
diesall a kirel el meduis; dmuis a delsangel, duiesii, otobed er a chelsel; meluis a semum, diesel a semum.
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iuochel, v.a.s.is to be opened or cut open.
iuochel a kirel el meiuch; meliuch a mengur, imuich a mekebud.
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okingall, v.a.s.is to be seated or appointed.
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otechedall, v.a.s.is to be made to give up.
otechedall a kirel el motoched; otechedii, oltoched er ngii er a meringel el tekoi; rullii el tmoched, diak el ungil el otechedall a chad.
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ukdengesall, v.a.s.is to be made full or satisfied.
ukdengesall a kirel el mukdinges; mekelii el mo medinges; mo diak el sengerenger; mekdengesii, omekdinges er ngii; ulekdengesel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.
rubakelder; old man; chief; foreign man; boyfriend; husband.rubakhaving the qualities of an old man.
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechascoconut at later stage (between medecheduch and metau) when shell blackens and husk turns yellowish brown.
chemarsleak (in something like a boat or a bucket).chemars(boat, bucket, etc.) leaky; leaking.
tangtikebikelsee-saw; teeter-totter.tangtikebikel(object) wobbly or in danger of falling over.
bukcorner; angle; joint; node.bkebkuulhaving many nodes; rough-edged; (shin of leg) have bumpy surface.
idokeldirtiness; filthiness.idokeldirtiness; filthiness.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
turk a rengulturk
keremerem a rengulstupid; ignorant.
omult er a rengulconvince; persuade.
ngar er a eou a rengul(person is) humble/respectful.
mengedidai er a rengul act stubbornly, scornfully or condescendingly.
meses a rengulindustrious; diligent.
diak lodengelii a rengul(person) unaware of his limitations or overestimates his abilities or overextends himself with committments.

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