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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

bleu, v.r.s.broken; cracked.
bleu a mla obeu; mecherad, mengii, a blatong bleu; bengel.
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chelsmekemek, v.r.s.(house, etc.) closed up; (ideas, etc.) conservative.
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derredirk, v.r.s.looked scornfully at.
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selbechakl, v.r.s.defended; helped.
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telebudel, v.r.s.skinned; scraped.
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uldengelengel, v.r.s.sent or thrown down slope; sailed downwind.
uldengelengel a urrebet er a eou; mla modengelengel; odengelengelel a mlai.
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ulterau, v.r.s.sold; given away.
ulterau a mla moterau; mla mochar; mla oterau a chutem, oterur a mesei; oterul a klolekled e kid a chelbed.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

besiochel, v.a.s.is to be adorned/decorated.
besiochel a kired el omesiich er ngii; omesiich, mesichii er a bung, mesiich, besichel.
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kekeringall, v.a.s.is to be made smaller or reduced in size.
kekeringall a kirel el mo kekerei; mengkekerei; kokeringii a blengur, kmekerei a mo delikik el kall, diak le klou, diak luleiis; kekeringil.
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ngikall, v.a.s.(excrement) is to be removed.
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oidall, v.a.s.is to be copied, translated or transferred.
oidall a kirel el moiuid; mutechei; chutem a oidall, oidii, oiuid a ngakl, oidel.
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orsngall, v.a.s.is to be drowned.
orsngall a kirel el moros; orros, olduleb, orsngii, diak el orsngall a charm; orsngel.
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oserechall, v.a.s.is to be pressed down or pinned onto.
oserechall a kirel el mosarech; oserechii a bdelul a smecher, osarech a meringel er a bedengel, oserechel a smecher.
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sibesongel, v.a.s.is to be tripped or hindered.
sibesongel a olibesongel; ngii di le ngera el melibas; tetuk el kerrekar a sibesongel er a rael; mesaik el chad a sibesongel er a urreor.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
chemaiongdragonfly.chemaiong prone to moving from one boyfriend or girlfriend to another.
kullcyst; tumor.kull having a cyst or tumor.
siktcluster/bunch of fruit.mesiktbe in a cluster (used only in mesikt el btuch).
chelechedsmall sea crab.chelechedambidextrous.
chadman; person; human being; living being; someone; somebody; anyone; anybody.chadliver.
chaseborash.chasebohaving rash or prickly heat.
chelechedsmall sea crab.chelechedarea of shallow water (usually exposed at low tide and good for fishing).

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
ouuchel er a rengulregret.
chelam a rengulheartbroken.
ngmasech a rengulget angry.
tmurk a rengulsatiated; fed up with.
komeklii a rengul(person) controlling themselves; (person) holding their tongue.
diak a rengulinconsiderate; impolite.
obais a rengulget fed up with; become unable to cope with.

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