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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blasech, v.r.s.counted, named or mentioned.
blasech a ngar a basech, mesechii, blasech er a omerael; besechel.
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blodes, v.r.s.(fish) boiled in water; (tongue) cut from eating pineapple, sugar cane, etc.
blodes a beldakl; medesii, modes, omeldakl, omodes, bedesel; blodes a terechel er a ngor; kltkat, blodes a ngerel er a ongor, bedesel.
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cheleldoech, v.r.s.has glow cast upon it.
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klabs, v.r.s.hung with rope; etc.; defeated (in hanahuda = card game).
klabs a mla mekabs; tuu a klebikl, kebsel.
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rrutech, v.r.s.touched.
rrutech a mla merutech; loia chimal er ngii; rutechii, remutech.
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selius, v.r.s.(fathers side relative) having been sworn at or spoken obscenely towards.
selius a mla mesius; mechas a selius er a dengerenger; diak longull a melius; siuesii. sellesilek; llel a kerrekar a sellesilek; eolt a mla smodel a llel a kerrekar.
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ulterau, v.r.s.sold; given away.
ulterau a mla moterau; mla mochar; mla oterau a chutem, oterur a mesei; oterul a klolekled e kid a chelbed.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bkebukel, v.a.s.is to be peeled (off).
bkebukel a obibkobk; beot el mengai a budel, obibkobk, mkebkii, tuu a bkebukel el kall.
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chebelall, v.a.s.is to be poured out.
chebelall a kirel el mochubel; moitel, ochebelall, olechubel a ralm, ochebelel.
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dedesall, v.a.s.(place) is to be cleared.
dedesall a kirel el mo mededaes; dmedesii, blai a dedesall diak le chelimeluk, dmedaes.
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delemekill, v.a.s.(post, stick, etc.) is to be driven into ground.
delemekill a kirel el medelemakl; kirel mukedechor; dolemeklii er a chutem; dolemakl a smengtel a chutem, mellemakl, delemeklel.
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ongesechall, v.a.s.is to be raised, sued or ascended.
ongesechall a kirel el mongasech el mo er a bab; ongesechii, ongesechel a tax; ongesechall a kirel el mongasech ongesechii a olterau a ice, ongesechel er a kort.
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semesall, v.a.s.is to be stuck or pricked.
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uchetall, v.a.s.(fishing line) is to be provided with leader.
uchetall a kirel el mochaet; loia uchaet er ngii; mchetii a kereel; mechaet a chetakl, uchetel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
rechorechstealing; theft; robbery; selfishness.sekerechorechprone to stealing.
brotechclapping; wooden paddle used as war weapon; applause; praise.bekebrotechprone to slapping.
chermallhibiscus (bark used as a rope; leaves used as mulch for taro).chermall having vagina which lubricates quickly.
chullrain; rainy season.chullrain; rainy season.
klukuktomorrow; the next or following day.klukuk be tomorrow; be the next or following day.
techiirhandnet with handle; cloth or screen for pressing coconut milk; sheath at base of coconut frond (used for pressing coconut milk).mekudem a techerel(person who) understands or catches everything.
bangikoibutterfly; moth.bangikoiprone to moving from one girlfriend/boyfriend to another.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
mekreos a rengulmiserly; avaricious; selfish.
kesib a rengulangry.
meched a rengulthirsty; impatient; prone to overreact; (deprived and) having strong desire for.
smiich a rengulfeel proud about (someone).
mekngit a rengulfeel sorry/sad about; mean; inconsiderate.
cheremremangel a rengulgreedy; stingy.
medengelii a rengulregain consciousness (after a faint or stroke); (person) self-confident or self-assured; (person) knowing his abilities or capacities.

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