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Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelubel, v.r.s.spilled; poured out; used up; out of stock; (widower and children) left alone (without wife or mother).
chelubel a mla mechubel; uleitel, chubelii, chuubel, chebelel, mengubel, chebelel a uasech.
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llechet, v.r.s.tied; wrapped; kept occupied or busy.
llechet a selaur; mla melechet; llechotel, rrengodel, lochetii, lmechet, lechetel.
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telngoech, v.r.s.(taro etc.) scraped.
telngoech a mla metngoech; mla medort; tingoech a kukau; meingoech. Klort (tekoi el mo er a kukau).
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telok, v.r.s.(toe) stubbed; (wood) planed against grain.
telok a ultok; diak el ungil; diak el ngar er a urebetellel a tekoi; telok el cheldecheduch.
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ullaol, v.r.s.(house) has had floor put on.
ullaol a mla mulaol; ngar ngii a ulolel, mla mlolii, ulolel.
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ultamet, v.r.s.pulled at; drawn tight or taut.
ultamet a mla motamet; klurs; ert a ultamet el mong; mla otemetii, otamet a kerrekar, otemetel.
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urralm, v.r.s.(clothes) rinsed.
urralm a mla muralm; mla mralm a selokel; urelmel.
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Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

cherdechedall, v.a.s.is to be fried.
cherdechedall a kirel el mecherdoched; chordechedii, chordoched a ngikel, cherdechedel.
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cherecheruul, v.a.s.(liquid; etc.) is to be stirred up/agitated.
cherecheruul a beot el mecherechar; mechecherechar, cherecheruul el omoachel.
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chesenguul, v.a.s.is to be occupied or busy.
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ochiball, v.a.s.is to be lifted up or revealed.
ochiball a kirel mochiib; mochederiib, klalo er a skoki a ochiball el kirel a skel a mekngit el kar; ochidall, ochibel.
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ongengetall, v.a.s.is to be lowered or demoted; is to be held or kept back.
ongengetall a kirel el mo er eou; mo er a uriul; monganget, mesaik a ongengetall a ududel el mo rredemelel a urrereel; ongengetel.
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tekiungel, v.a.s.needs to be talked to; (person) is being talked about (because of bad behavior, etc.).
tekiungel a kirel el mo er ngii a tekoi; soadel er a beluu, tekiungel er a beluu er a omengubs.el sers.
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uketkall, v.a.s.is to be reminded.
ukltkall a kirel el muklatk; omeklatk me lak lobes a klumech; mekltkii me lolim a kar, ukltkel.
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State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechashaving the qualities of an old woman.
chadliver.chedengaolhave a large liver.
iitmiss; failure.iitpast; over (with); finished; through.
chudelgrass.chudelgrass.
singodor of sperm.besingsmell of sperm; smell unclean (esp., used in insults referring to women).
iluodelstones, coconut shells, or similar objects used as support for cooking pot during serving.iluodel(people) sitting, standing or arranged in a circle; (stone platform) built circular.
kerdikyaws; framboesia.kerdikyaws; framboesia.

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
rrau a rengulconfused/puzzled by/about.
omal er a rengulastonish; amaze; impress; cause admiration.
omekerrau er a rengulconfuse; puzzle.
seselkang a rengulbecoming bored or impatient.
smuuch a rengul(person) calm/placid.
bedis a rengulinconsiderate.
mechuached a rengulevil; mean; stubborn.

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