Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

blitelek, v.r.s.rolled on the ground.
blitelek a mla obitelek; blengkangk, mitekelengii, mitelek, bitekelengel.
See also:
chelsuar, v.r.s.(face) slapped; slapped in the face.
chelsuar a chelsbad, chellebed a medal, mla mechesuar.
See also:
delibuk, v.r.s.tied into knot.
delibuk a mla medibuk; omech a eru el klalo; melibuk a odak a erung e doibuk el mo tang el blech, delibkolel.
See also:
rrar, v.r.s.(food) heated so as not to spoil; (hands, etc.) warmed over or next to fire.
See also:
uliitel, v.r.s.(liquid) poured (into container).
uliitel a mla moitel; mla mochubel; ilumel a uliitel er a kob; oitelii a ralm; oitel a ilumel; olechubel; oitelel.
See also:
urreked, v.r.s.held onto; grasped.
urreked a urrekodel; mla orkedii a chutem; urreked a mesei e mekreos; orekedel a klalo.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bedikel, v.a.s.is to be cut/slit/operated on.
bedikel a kirel el obodk; smecher a bedikel, medkii a medal, bodk, bedkel
See also:
bekesengchall, v.a.s.is to be forced open/pulled apart by force.
bekesengchall a kirel el obekesangch, obok, mekesengchii a chesimer, mekengii, bekesengchel.
See also:
bengodel, v.a.s.is to be put or held on or against.
bengodel a kired el omenged er ngii; mengedii, omenged, kebui a bengodel er a kerrekar, bengedel.
See also:
lechengaol, v.a.s.is to be put/taken.
lechengaol a kirel el modars; kles a lechengaol er a bai; loiang, lochang.
See also:
ltukel, v.a.s.(someone) is to be remembered (because he will be a titled person).
ltukel a kirel a omelatk; ungil a omerellel el chad a ltukel; klou a omelatk el kirel; kedung el chad a ltukel, ltkel.
See also:
udechemall, v.a.s.is to be caught or captured.
udechemall a kirel el mudechem; kirel el motoir el moreked; mdechemii a malk; mdechem a babii, udechemel.
See also:
ungelmall, v.a.s.is to be given drink or made to drink.
ungelmall a kirel el mongim; msa imelel; omngim er ngii; ungelmel.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
bisechwild taro (makes mouth itchy).bisech(person) easily aroused sexually.
chemadechcoconut sap.chemadechcoconut sap.
chemarsleak (in something like a boat or a bucket).chemars(boat, bucket, etc.) leaky; leaking.
uesvision; sight; view.sekoesperceptive; sharp-minded; acute; sensitive; aware of one's responsibilities or surroundings; capable of looking at something thoroughly or seeing all the angles and possibilities.
tangtikebikelsee-saw; teeter-totter.tangtikebikel(object) wobbly or in danger of falling over.
chemanglarge sea or mangrove crab; Samoan crab.bekechemangsmell of crabs (after cooking or eating crabs).
dechudechdirt; mud; patching material; filling (for cavity).dechudechdirt; mud; patching material; filling (for cavity).

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
mengurs er a rengulattract.
moded a rengul(person is) easygoing/even-tempered.
urrengulelurungulel
ngellitel a rengulchoosy.
luut er a rengulanything causing one to lose one's resolve.
bedis a rengulinconsiderate.
tmuu er a rengul(something) occurs to (person)/enters (person's) mind.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.166.168.243','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')