Quick links:

Palauan Adjectives

The following is a brief discussion about Palauan adjectives. For a longer exploration, please refer to discussions of state verbs in the Joseph Handbooks. According to the official Lewis Joseph grammar book of Palauan, there are no Palauan parts of speech called adjectives. However, Palauan does, of course, have words used to describe other words. In English, we call these words adjectives. Examples of English adjectives are dangerous, beautiful, and hot.

Palauan Resulting State Verbs

In Palauan, words corresponding to English adjectives are called state verbs. There are several types of Palauan state verbs. The most common are resulting state verbs which occur as a result of a verb. Some examples:

Here is a list of seven random Palauan verbs and their resulting state verbs:

chelid, v.r.s.(neck) turned to one side; (something) twisted or wrung.
chelid a omur; chidir a chiklel, chelid a chiklel, mengid er a chiklel; chelid a telemall el delomel, dait el delebes el cheroid er techel me ng diak el dubech.
See also:
delidui, v.r.s.peeped at; looked for.
See also:
delsongel, v.r.s.cut; sliced; slit (open).
See also:
terrekakl, v.r.s.abused; not taken care of; carelessness.
terrekakl a diak el ulekedmokl; terrekakl el ngalek a diak le cheleoch; meterekakl er ngii; terrekeklel.
See also:
ulchetekl, v.r.s.messed up.
See also:
ulserechakl, v.r.s.stepped on (and giving off sound).
ulserechakl a klou a rengul; ulsarech a rengul; diak el beot el ngmasech a rengul; ulserecheklel.
See also:

 

Palauan Anticipating State Verbs

Anticipating state verbs in Palauan are like resulting state verbs. However, instead of describing the state of something after a verb has modified it, these describe the state of something before a verb is anticipated to modify it. Here's seven random Anticipating State Verbs:

bechall, v.a.s.(firewood) is to be split.
See also:
chelechall, v.a.s.is to be reminded.
See also:
chemachel, v.a.s.(betel nut) is to be chewed; (tobacco) is to be smoked.
chemachel a redil el ourrot er a blil el motobed er a ocheraolbai me a klomengelungel, oungerachel a udoud me a rokui el tekoi.
See also:
chesechaol, v.a.s.are to be threaded/strung; always wandering from house to house.
chesechaol a chad el soal el mengesuch; merael a blai, di omais el diak el ultebechel.
See also:
lecheluchel, v.a.s.is to be sawed.
lecheluchel a lechelechall.
See also:
sechesall, v.a.s.is to be propped open.
sechesall a kirel el mesuches; suchesii, meluches, baiong a sechesall; smuches.
See also:
ukdengesall, v.a.s.is to be made full or satisfied.
ukdengesall a kirel el mukdinges; mekelii el mo medinges; mo diak el sengerenger; mekdengesii, omekdinges er ngii; ulekdengesel.
See also:

 

State Verbs with Related Nouns

In English, a common thing to do is to ask 'how XXXX is something,' where XXXX is an adjective. For example, 'how hot is that,' or 'how dangerous is that,' are common English expressions.

This is true in Palauan as well in a form like, 'ng uangarang a kleldelel,' which translates literally perhaps to something like, 'it is like what, its heat,' or figuratively as, 'how hot is it.' The word kleldelel is a possessed noun meaning 'its heat.' See the nouns page for a longer explanation of possessed nouns.

Many of these Palauan nouns have related state verbs which translate to, and are used as, English adjectives. Here is a list of seven random Palauan nouns along with their corresponding state verbs.

Palauan_NounEngish_NounPalauan_AdjEnglish_Adj
burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.burachedskin disease in which white spots spread over body.
mudechvomit.bekemudechsmell of vomit.
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechas
brotechclapping; wooden paddle used as war weapon; applause; praise.bekebrotechprone to slapping.
mechasold woman; titled woman; foreign woman; male's father's sisters; girlfriend; wife.mechascoconut at later stage (between medecheduch and metau) when shell blackens and husk turns yellowish brown.
chaseborash.chasebohaving rash or prickly heat.
kemangetlength (of string, etc.) which exceeds what is needed or expected.kemangettall; long (in time or dimension).

Reng Idioms as Adjectives

There are many Palauan expressions which use a state verb to describe the Palauan word reng which means spirit or heart. These are idioms which mean their literal and figurative meanings are not the same. Typically, but not always, the figurative meaning describes an emotion. An example is kesib a reng, which literally means a sweaty heart but figuratively it means to be angry. Here is a list of seven random examples of these reng idioms:

PalauanEnglish
meched a rengulthirsty; impatient; prone to overreact; (deprived and) having strong desire for.
ngemokel a renguldesirous off; lusting after.
betik er a rengulone's beloved.
smuuch a rengul(person) calm/placid.
merael a rengulindecisive.
omal er a rengulastonish; amaze; impress; cause admiration.
ngelekel a rengulfavorite child.

WARN Table 'belau.log_bots' doesn't exist
INSERT INTO log_bots (page,ip,agent,user,proxy) VALUES ('adjectives.php','54.196.201.241','CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/)','','')